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Founding Partner University of Technology, Sydney

The University of Technology, Sydney is an Australian university with an international focus. UTS is a recognised leader in teaching and learning with a model founded on discovery, creativity and collaboration. UTS research aims to reach out to the world, to drive change and discover practical solutions to national and international problems.

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Articles (1 - 20 of 661)

A still from a NSW election ad, run on television and online, which says “selling the electricity network is wrong; selling it to another country is just not on”. CFMEU Mining/YouTube

Playing the China card may win votes, but it’s bad for Australia

Labor and the unions have decided to play the China card in the NSW election. Such scare campaigns ignore the facts, including that Australia has invested almost as much in China as China has here.
In Crystal Romeo, artist Técha Noble presents a diverse body of work: etchings, experimental projections and costume, brought together by her own sophisticated version of camp aesthetics. Alex Davies

Técha Noble’s Crystal Romeo negotiates the camp in Australian landscape art

The work of Norman Lindsay is a starting point for Techa Noble's camp challenges to the traditional modes of representing the Australian landscape.
Premier Mike Baird and Communities Minister Victor Dominello have vigorously pursued their vision for peak body Multicultural NSW. AAP/Dan Himbrechts

Multicultural mayhem lurks in the shadows of the NSW election

Multicultural issues are stirring in NSW. They range from education, aged care and health through to political rights to commemorate unresolved overseas conflicts.
Vanuatu has a well-co-ordinated disaster response system but limited material resources. Medical support is needed when a disaster like Cyclone Pam strikes. EPA/UNICEF

Beyond Cyclone Pam: identifying Vanuatu’s strengths and needs

The people of Vanuatu have always had to cope with extreme weather events, but natural disasters on the scale of Cyclone Pam test their strengths and leave areas of vulnerability exposed.
Malcolm Fraser has passed away at the age of 84. AAP/NAA

Malcolm Fraser’s life and legacy: experts respond

In his time in office, Malcolm Fraser oversaw the acceptance of southeast Asian refugees and led economic and social welfare reforms.
Money spent on helping consumers reduce demand means less money spent on substations and other infrastructure. Bidgee/Wikimedia Commons

A simple rule change can save billions for power networks and their customers

Incentives for cutting peak power demand are cheaper than building ever more infrastructure and sending power bills ever higher. The industry has a chance to embrace this new approach - but will it?
Olwen Fuoéré performing riverrun, her stage adaptation of James Joyce’s last work, Finnegans Wake. Colm Hogan, Adelaide Festival of Arts

The amateur’s age of unriddling: Finnegans Wake on stage

Olwen Fuoéré's extraordinary adaptation of Finnegans Wake for the stage brings a work with a reputation for obscurity back into the realm of popular culture.
We all need to learn the art of negotiation. Julia Taylor

When negotiating, who should make the first offer?

We all negotiate every day, from discussing dinner options, to seeking a pay rise or striking an international business deal. But what does the research show about who should make the first offer?
Farming makes a huge contribution to global greenhouse emissions, mainly through methane from livestock. Billy Hathorn/Wikimedia Commons

Meat the future: new book sets out the effects of the world’s diet

Meat uses a lot of resources - between three and ten times as much as plants for the same amount of protein. The rich world might be slowly losing its taste for meat, but the developing world isn't.
Women and older people form two ‘armies’ Treasurer Joe Hockey is hoping will help protect Australia’s future prosperity. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Hockey looks to ‘armies’ in Intergenerational Report: experts react

Experts question where the jobs for older Australians will come from.
Australia likely has several decades of coal left in it yet. eyeweed/flickr

Four ways to boost Australia’s economy that can help the climate

Australia likely has decades of fossil fuels left to extract, export and burn. That could prove to be a problem if the world comes to an agreement on climate change. Here's four ways to help the economy, and the climate.
Gold Coast Titan Greg Bird could face action by WADA on top of court charges stemming from drug supply allegations. AAP/Dave Hunt

Illicit drugs: Australian sports intervene while WADA spectates

The World Anti-Doping Authority looks on from the sidelines in case there is an opportunity to punish athletes' involvement with illicit drugs out of competition.
Roseina Boston onstage at the 2005 Melbourne International Arts Festival with the ensemble Pannikin. (Courtesy Jon Rose, used with permission.)

Art of the gumleaf: Gumbaynggirr elder Roseina Boston turns 80

The gumleaf is a wind instrument that comes with a steep learning curve. Today we celebrate the 80th birthday of one of its key proponents, Roseina Boston.
Kangaroos are common in some areas but scarce in others. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

FactCheck: are kangaroos at risk?

Are kangaroos in plague proportions, necessitating large-scale killing and a commercial industry, or are they in decline?
How can we assess whether or not Australian cultural policies work if we don’t have the data to measure participation? AAP Image/Nikki Short

What ABS cultural participation data tells us about cultural policy

The results of the latest cultural participation survey conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics show how valuable the data really is.
The march towards equal marriage rights in Ireland is well ahead of Australia, yet the level of public support in each nation is remarkably similar. William Murphy/Flickr

The battle for middle Ireland and Australia over marriage equality

Support for equal marriage rights in Ireland and Australia is remarkably similar: 71% in Ireland and 72% in Australia. The key difference is that Australian politicians are choosing not to listen.

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