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Captain America was one of several nationalistic superheroes created during the Second World War era. © Marvel

Speaking with: Jason Dittmer on superheroes and fascism

Speaking with Jason Dittmer on superheroes and fascism.
America's flirtations with fascism in the 1930s and the influence of the Second World War gave rise to nationalistic, quasi-fascist superheroes who are still relevant and popular today.
Selling students short comes at an important time for higher education in Australia: funding uncertainties and questions over academic standards have never been more pronounced. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Book review: Selling Students Short

Richard Hil’s Selling Students Short: Why You Won’t Get the Education You Deserve is a timely exposé of the difficult conditions facing students at Australia’s increasingly corporatised universities.
Record-low interest rates could further inflate the housing markets in Sydney and Melbourne. Paul Miller/AAP

Speaking with: Keith Jacobs on the politics of housing

While policies such as negative gearing have helped middle to high income earners own property, they have also locked low income earners out of the market and created an unequal housing sector.
Opposition leader Bill Shorten, Shadow Treasurer Chris Bowen and Shadow Assistant Treasurer Andrew Leigh have said their multinational tax package will make big firms pay their fair share. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Labor’s multinational tax package misses the point

The tax package recently announced by the Federal Labor party is clearly well intentioned but it misses the point about multinationals paying their fair share.
Ice-cream that understands PMS? Parker Jones

PMS ice-cream doesn’t have to be some kind of period drama

Premenstrual stress (PMS) runs the gamut of minor inconvenience to severe life-disrupting distress. So is the packaging for a range of “ice-cream that understands PMS” created by a 21-year-old American…
An artist’s concept of two NASA Earth-orbiting cube satellites with a typical volume of just one litre (10cm x 10cm x 10cm). NASA/JPL-Caltech

Space treaties are a challenge to launching small satellites in orbit

We're already building satellites that can sit in the palm of your hand. But getting them into orbit can be a challneg, and not only for technical reasons.
Children growing up in a world of social media are developing a very different conception of privacy to that of their parents. Ed Ivanushkin/Flickr

Online and out there: how children view privacy differently from adults

Many people are shocked by what children are willing to share about themselves online. Is it that they don't understand privacy, or just have a different conception of it compared to adults?
‘A dramatised event is no replacement for the horrors of what is really going on.’ AAP Image/NewZulu/Nicolas Koutsokostas

The ‘refugee telemovie’ shows our government is lost at sea

The government has announced its latest method to stop the boats: a telemovie with storylines about asylum seekers dying at sea. Is it really the role of government to fund propaganda pieces like this?
The rise of ‘the Richies’ half a century after Benaud’s time as a Test captain, here at the match against India in Sydney in January, is evidence of a career that became a cultural phenomenon. AAP/Dean Lewins

Cricket, commentary and the dollar: Benaud’s legacy is complex

Richie Benaud was a key figure in cricket’s transformation into an entertainment business. A reading of his life is a tale of the changing relationships between sport, media, business and society.
Young people take a keen interest in key policy areas such as climate change – the main problem is a lack of government engagement with them on such intergenerational issues. AAP/Newzulu/Zoe Reynolds

How to engage youth in making policies that work for us all

Lack of youth involvement in politics is often attributed to lack of interest. But my research indicates the bigger barrier is government capacity to listen to and work with young people’s views.
George Brandis has a heavy load to lift as Attorney-General – but his priorities for the Arts portfolio could be clarified. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

What are the priorities for George Brandis, Minister for the Arts?

For artists and cultural workers, a change of government leads to a change of priorities – and often, opportunities disappear. So what do we know about the priorities for the current Minister for the Arts?
The Bellinger Snapping Turtle is under threat, and that bodes ill for the entire ecosystem. Copyright: Gary Bell/OceanwideImages.com

Turtle extinction event bodes ill for our waterways

The Bellinger River Snapping Turtle is under threat of extinction, and it suggests something very wrong with the whole ecosystem.
Many cities are starting to recognise that street art has both a cultural and economic value. SalTheColourGeek/Flickr

Speaking with: Cameron McAuliffe on graffiti, art and crime

Speaking with: Cameron McAuliffe on graffiti, art and crime. CC BY-ND21.2 MB (download)
Is graffiti art or crime? While many cities have adopted tough legal measures to prevent graffiti, they are also beginning to recognise the cultural and economic value of street art.
Some people may be turned on knowing their sexual activities are being monitored by experts. Yves Hanoulle/Flickr

Health Check: why some people have sex for science

The who, how, and what of sex-based laboratory studies may all be a little problematic, so can we generalise from their findings?

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