University of Wollongong

The University of Wollongong has become a benchmark for Australia’s new generation of universities. It is ranked among the best 20 modern universities in the world* and has built a reputation as an enterprising institution, with a multi-disciplinary approach to research and a personalised approach to teaching. Over 32,000 students are studying UOW degrees across nine campuses throughout Australia and internationally in Dubai and Hong Kong.

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John Howard, pictured here with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, is fond of describing the Liberal Party as a “broad church”. But that breadth has led to increasing fracture within the party in recent years. AAP/Dean Lewins

Can the Liberal Party hold its ‘broad church’ of liberals and conservatives together?

The battle between liberals and conservatives continues to split the Liberal Party, but its past heroes would find the ideological division puzzling.
Picture painted by a primary school child in Sri Lanka after the tsunami in 2005. UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Children aren’t liabilities in disasters – they can help, if we let them

It's understandable to want to shield children from the impacts of disasters. But research suggests that they should be given a voice in disaster planning and a role in reducing the risks.
The Department of Human Services approach to social security fraud prosecutions has become less punitive in recent years. Julian Smith/AAP

Why prosecutions for welfare fraud have declined in Australia

Despite a public focus on punitive approaches to welfare fraud, the number of social security fraud prosecutions has fallen in recent years.
When we get hot, sensors in the body tell the brain. The brain then tells the sweat glands to work, and we sweat. Marcella Cheng/NY-CC-BD

Curious Kids: What happens in the body when we sweat?

Sweat comes from special parts in our skin called glands. You might be able to see them if you have a very strong magnifying glass.
Since sodium is abundant, battery technology that uses it side-steps many of the issues associated with lithium batteries. Paul Jones/UOW

Charging ahead: how Australia is innovating in battery technology

Demand for energy storage is increasing – both in Australia and around the world. But issues with the production of lithium-ion batteries mean the search is on for alternatives.
There are concerns that the new draft poultry standards don’t truly have chickens’ welfare at heart. Ben Romalis/Shutterstock.com

Governments can’t be trusted to deliver welfare standards for chickens

The current review of standards for egg and poultry farming does little to assuage fears that the industry wields too much influence. Only an independent regulator can restore public confidence.
Despite billions spent on trying to save water in the Murray Darling Basin, results have been disappointing. John Williams

The Murray Darling Basin Plan is not delivering – there’s no more time to waste

A dozen leading researchers have issued an urgent call to action for the Murray-Darling Basin, arguing that the billions spent on water-efficient irrigation have done little for the rivers' health.
For the global tuna industry, which has historically struggled with illegal and environmentally dubious fishing practices, the use of blockchain could be a turning point. WWF

How blockchain is strengthening tuna traceability to combat illegal fishing

Blockchain is now helping to bring much-needed transparency to the global tuna industry, which has been prone to corruption, human slavery and unsustainable fishing practices.

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