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Mella Jaarsma, The landscaper 2013, costume: wood, paint, iron and leather, single-channel video: 3:40 minutes, colour, sound. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Purchased 2018. Photo by Mie Cornoedus

Indonesian art is fresh, energetic and lively. Why do we not see more of it?

The exhibition Contemporary Worlds: Indonesia has many wonderful works. But it is an exception - despite our close proximity, there are few opportunities for Australians to engage with Indonesian art.
Zahra Newman in Wake in Fright. A new adaptation of Kenneth Cook’s novel retells the story of a man’s descent into violent masculinity with a female voice, accompanied by visual and aural spectacle. Pia Johnson

A radical new adaptation eviscerates the dominance of male voices in Wake in Fright

In a new adaptation of the classic Australian novel, the story of masculinity and despair in the outback is told through a female voice.
Dallas Dellaforce, Queer Central, Imperial Hotel, Erskineville, 2018. ‘Queerdom’ presents an archive of queer and trans life in Sydney. Queerdom/James Eades

An intimate, arresting exhibition highlights the hard work of living queer

Queerdom, an exhibition of photography and poetry, presents a history of queer and trans performance in Sydney that challenges recent narratives about queer life in Australia.
Installation view of Cai Guo-Qiang’s Murmuration (Landscape) 2019 (detail) Realised in Dehua, Fujian. province and Melbourne, commissioned by the NGV. Proposed acquisition supported by Ying Zhang in association with the Asian Australian Foundation, 2019 NGV Foundation Annual Dinner and 2019 NGV Annual Appeal, on display at NGV International. © Cai Guo- Qiang. Photo © Tobias Titz

A scope as big as humanity can conjure: the Terracotta Warriors & Cai Guo-Qiang

A new exhibition pairs China's famed Terracotta Warriors with contemporary works of inspiring ethereality. The contrasts here are many: life and death, harmony and chaos, energy and control, art and politics.
Juan de Dios Mateos as Cavalier Belfiore and Ruth Iniesta as Corinna in Opera Australia’s 2019 production of Il Viaggio a Reims at Arts Centre Melbourne. Jeff Busby

A night at the opera: art comes alive in a modern twist on Rossini’s Il Viaggio a Reims

Gioachino Rossini's opera was originally meant as a satire of royalist France. A new production updates the work for a modern audience, setting the drama in a museum where the paintings come to life.
One of the most powerful images at this year’s Venice Biennale is Christoph Büchel’s. Barca Nostra, 2018-2019, Shipwreck 18th of April 2015. La Biennale di Venezia

As we face pressing global issues, the pavilions of Venice Biennale are a 21st century anomaly

Often called the 'Olympic Games of art', the Venice Biennale's national pavilions are an outlier in a globalised world. This year's strongest works explore global issues like refugees and climate change.
Scott Sheridan and Natasha Herbert in Cloudstreet, a new production of the stage adaptation of Tim Winton’s literary epic. Pia Johnson

In Cloudstreet, nostalgia all too easily redeems Australia’s colonial past

A new production of Cloudstreet - the play adapted from Tim Winton's literary epic - is visually arresting. But despite a diverse cast, Indigenous characters remain spectral and peripheral.
Detail from Archibald Prize 2019 finalist Keith Burt, ‘Benjamin Law: happy sad’ oil on canvas, 59.5 x 59.5 cm, © the artist. Photo: AGNSW, Jenni Carter Sitter: Benjamin Law - author, journalist and broadcaster

Puckish charm and no politicians: the 2019 Archibald Prize

Perhaps as a reflection of the current state of national affairs, this year's Archibald Prize exhibition is a politician-free zone.
Marcel Duchamp, ‘From or by Marcel Duchamp or Rrose Sélavy (Box in a valise)’ 1935-41, 1963-65 (contents); Series F, 1966 edition, mixed media, 41.3 x 38.4 x 9.5 cm Philadelphia Museum of Art, gift of Mme Marcel Duchamp, 1994-43-1. © Association Marcel Duchamp/ADAGP. Copyright Agency, 2019

The essential Duchamp: an exotic radical who rejected the establishment

Some 50 years after his death, a major exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales shows why the work of Marcel Duchamp continues to challenge the very idea of what art may be.
Members of Brisbane’s Sudanese community celebrate the signing of a peace accord that signalled an end to the Second Sudanese Civil War in 2005. The first recorded African-diaspora settlers in Australia were convicts who landed with the First Fleet in 1788. Dave Hunt/AAP

Growing Up African in Australia: racism, resilience and the right to belong

A new collection of writing by African-diaspora Australians shares a diversity of experiences: stories of displacement, isolation, endurance and the right to call Australia home.
Following the whirlwind success of Nanette, Hannah Gadsby recreates comedy as a safe, comfortable space in her new show Douglas. Supplied

Hannah Gadsby’s follow-up to Nanette is an act of considered self-care

Hannah Gadsby's groundbreaking stand-up show Nanette was always going to be hard to follow. Her new show is a deftly executed, brilliant comedy about women and autism.

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