Articles on Human rights

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Australia is the only Western democracy without some form of charter of rights legislated by parliament or entrenched in the constitution. Lukas Coch/AAP

Why an Australian charter of rights is a matter of national urgency

We have a serious deficit in legal protection for human rights in Australia, rights that have been in regression for 20 years. We need a legislated charter setting out the rights we care about.
Dalia Yashar, one of the first Saudi female students in training to become commercial pilot, pictured on July 15, 2018. Her future passengers will include solo women travelers, too. Reuters/Hamad I Mohammed

Saudi women are fighting for their freedom – and their hard-won victories are growing

Saudi women may now travel without a man's permission, easing one of the most repressive aspects of the country's 'guardianship' system. Women in Saudi Arabia gained the right to drive last year.
Uyghurs in Australia are pressing Canberra to take a firmer stance with China on its treatment of the Muslim minority. Thus far, Australia’s response has been relatively muted. Tracey Nearmy/AAP

Despite China’s denials, its treatment of the Uyghurs should be called what it is: cultural genocide

China says it is helping the Uyghurs, but its actions meet the threshold of cultural genocide: 'a premeditated, calculated, systematic, malicious crime authorised by the state’s political leaders'.
In February, thousands of women marched in Mexico City to demand that President Andrés Manuel López Obrador do more to keep women safe. The protest sign featured here reads, ‘Don’t be indifferent.’ Reuters/Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Mexican president López Obrador has a woman problem

Mexico is the second most dangerous country for women in Latin America. Yet the new government is slashing funding for programs meant to protect and empower women.
Fatou Bensouda, ICC Prosecutor, and Robert H. Jackson, two key figures in international criminal justice, from Nuremberg to The Hague. AFP/Wikimedia

Why the United States rejects international criminal justice: looking back at Nuremberg

When faced with US rejection of international criminal justice, today's supporters of the ICC often invoke the country's Nuremberrg leadership. However, this notion is based on a distorted image of the 1945-46 trials.
Under a new deal between the U.S. and Mexico, Mexico will send 6,000 troops to its southern border with Guatemala to prevent migrants from continuing their northward journey toward the United States. Reuters/Jose Torres

Migrants will pay the price of Mexico’s tariff deal with Trump

Mexico says it emerged from tariff negotiations in Washington with its 'dignity intact.' But that dignity comes at great cost to the migrants fleeing extreme violence in Central America.
Chen Yabian, 74, of Hainan Province, southern China, testifies during the International Symposium on Chinese ‘Comfort Women’ in 2000 in Shanghai that she was 14 when Japanese Imperial Army soldiers forced her to work as a sex slave during the war. AP/Eugene Hoshiko

Recent attempts at reparations show that World War II is not over

US agreements with Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria provide reparations to WWII victims. But an international law scholar writes that the US has failed to address war crimes in Asia.
The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, who have tracked over 100 children stolen by Argentina’s 1976-1983 military junta, were among the human rights activists that pushed the US to declassify intelligence documents related to the dictatorship. Reuters/Marcos Brindicci

Truth, justice and declassification: Secret archives show US helped Argentine military wage ‘dirty war’ that killed 30,000

Traveling death squads. Sadistic torture techniques. Stolen babies. The US helped it all happen by aiding Argentina's military regime in the 1970s, according to newly declassified documents.

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