Articles on Justin Trudeau

Displaying 1 - 20 of 74 articles

U.S. President Donald Trump announces a revamped North American free trade deal in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on Oct. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Make no mistake: The USMCA is an America-first trade deal

The USMCA, if ratified, will fundamentally alter North America’s political and economic structures, increasing American dominance over its neighbours.
A young Indigenous boy waits to dance after the Walk for Reconciliation in Vancouver in September 2017. The election of the Justin Trudeau government in 2015 seems to have fuelled a shift in how Indigenous people are described in the media. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

From ‘Aboriginal’ to ‘Indigenous’ in the Justin Trudeau era

The election of Justin Trudeau in 2015 has coincided with a shift in language in the media -- the term 'Aboriginal' has been increasingly replaced by the term 'Indigenous.' Here's why.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland hold a news conference on the United States Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA) in Ottawa on Oct. 1, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

How the new USMCA strengthens Canada in future trade deals

The USMCA, while imperfect, is overall a positive development for Canada. It has a number of structural elements that may very well leave us stronger when negotiating trade pacts in the future.
Steve Courtoreille, chief of the Mikisew Cree First Nation, is seen on Parliament Hill in January 2013 after speaking about legal action against the federal government. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against the First Nation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

What the Supreme Court ruling means for Indigenous consultation

The headlines suggest the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against Indigenous consultation. But its recent ruling is much more nuanced and complex than that.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland arrive to hold a news conference on the United States Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA) in Ottawa on Oct. 1, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The winners and losers in the new NAFTA

Who are the winners and losers in the new USMCA? It's complicated, but one thing's for certain: Canada should never again allow itself to be overly dependent upon one trading partner.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gives a thumbs up as he arrives on Parliament Hill the morning after an agreement was reached on a new trade deal with Mexico and the U.S. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

NAFTA has been replaced, but at what cost to Canada?

The relief that the U.S. didn’t make things even worse for Canada in the new NAFTA should be tempered by the realization that the moment of reckoning hasn’t passed; it’s only been postponed.
A resident of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation is photographed while speaking about water and access issues in her community in February 2015. The Shoal Lake community, despite supplying water to the city of Winnipeg, has long been under a boil-water advisory and is only just getting year-round road access. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

We fail our citizens in Canada – and the UN is onto us

Governments in Canada are routinely enacting public policies that primarily benefit economic elites, raising questions about government legitimacy and competency. Who's looking out for us?
Canadian troops arrive to a UN base in Gao, Mali, on in June 2018, amid an insurgency by jihadist and ethnic rebel groups. Canada has yet to impose sanctions on the African country because it lacks names to target for asset freezes and other measures. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s growing challenges with economic sanctions

The federal government has set aside $22.2 million to develop and co-ordinate sanctions while educating Canadians about their obligations. Where to start is the first question.
Why isn’t sustainability a part of accounting training? (Shutterstock)

It’s time to train accountants in sustainability

Despite the leaders of both countries being champions of fighting climate change, research shows both Canada and France are failing to train their accountants in sustainability. Why?
People hold artwork of various marine life and youth during a rally celebrating a recent federal court ruling against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in Vancouver, on Sept. 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

No quick or easy resolution to the Trans Mountain pipeline question

Contrary to what some have suggested, the uncertainty over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will be drawn out.
People buy fruits and vegetables in May 2017 at the Jean-Talon farmers market in Montreal. (Shutterstock)

A Canadian food policy moves closer to becoming a reality

A government report on an upcoming national food policy is an optimistic indication that it will result in both healthier and more sustainable food for Canadians and stronger agri-food industry.
In this April 2017 photo, Wisconsin dairy farmer Tim Prosser is seen with his cows. Canada’s tough stance on diafiltered milk via its supply-management system has caused hardship for farmers like Prosser, forced to consider selling their milking cows and shutting down family businesses. (AP Photo/Cara Lombardo)

How the dairy lobby’s cash grab put Canada in Trump’s crosshairs

Canadian dairy farmers were already well-heeled and well-protected from world market forces, but their cash grab over something called diafiltered milk has put the entire Canadian economy at risk.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at a news conference in Ottawa in June 2018. A United Nations housing watchdog has criticized the Liberals over what it sees as their about-face on a promise to put a human rights lens on its housing strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s complicated relationship with international human rights law

If the liberal international order is to survive, countries like Canada will need to defend international human rights law.
An asylum-seeker saying he’s from Eritrea is confronted by an RCMP officer as he crosses the border into Canada from the United States on Aug. 21 near Champlain, N.Y. Canadians have false beliefs about the so-called migration crisis, and politicians are capitalizing on it. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Canadian politicians are playing a dangerous game on migration

Canada's opposition Conservatives are borrowing from European populists in stoking fears about asylum-seekers and migrants. Here's why that's so dangerous.
Maxime Bernier announces he will leave the Conservative party during a news conference in Ottawa on Aug. 23, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Maxime Bernier’s bold move

Maxime Bernier has announced he's forming a new conservative party to challenge Andrew Scheer's Conservatives. Don't count him out. Politics has shown us recently that the impossible can happen.
Women were only just granted permission to drive in Saudi Arabia, a kingdom with an atrocious human rights record. Canada can and should leverage its ongoing spat with the country to advocate for human rights across the Middle East. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

How Canada could use the Saudi quarrel to help the Middle East – and itself

The Saudi-Canadian row offers Canada an opportunity to adopt a new Middle East policy based on universal human rights that address the needs of the many and contributes to regional stability.
Far from a knee-jerk reaction to Toronto’s recent mass shooting, fresh calls for tougher gun control laws have a long history in Canada. A man places his hand on his handgun in B.C. in 2014 during the International Practical Shooting Confederation Canada national championships. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Calls for stronger handgun laws in Canada have deep roots

Calls to outlaw handguns in Canada are hardly knee-jerk proposals in response to violent incidents. Instead, they're in line with the historic Canadian trend to limit the presence of modern pistols.
Activists stage a demonstration against the so-called CETA trade deal outside the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, in February 2017. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)Special Instruction

The uncertain future of the Canadian-European trade deal

An imminent court ruling by the European Union will decide the future of the economic partnership between Canada and the EU. It has broader implications for multilateralism in international trade.
Mary Ng is hugged by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after being sworn in as Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion during a swearing-in ceremony at Rideau Hall on July 18, 2018. The cabinet shuffle sets the stage for the next federal election in the fall of 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Trudeau’s cabinet shuffle patches holes before next election

With a federal election next year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has shuffled his cabinet. What do the new faces in new jobs tell us about where the government feels it could be challenged?

Top contributors

More