Articles on Neurons

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We knew people with Parkinson’s disease were at heightened risk of developing addictive behaviours like gambling. Our research gives insight into why this is. From shutterstock.com

Why do many people with Parkinson’s disease develop an addiction? We built a virtual casino to find out

About one in six people who take the most common medication for Parkinson's disease will develop addictive behaviours. We found whether this happens depends on a person's unique brain structure.
Existing BMIs focus on restoring function for people with mobility or communication issues. UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences

Brain-machine interfaces are getting better and better – and Neuralink’s new brain implant pushes the pace

BMIs like the ones Neuralink is working on are already used in laboratories around the world as assistive technologies. But melding your mind with an AI is probably not happening anytime soon.
Your brain is about 70% water. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: how much does a brain weigh?

An adult brain weighs about 1.5kg. It's mostly water with some fat, protein, sugar and a dash of salt. Sounds like pancakes, I know, but I once tried chicken brains and, well, pancakes are tastier.
Feeling itch is a warning from your skin. from www.shutterstock.com

Health Check: why do we itch?

Itch is usually caused by something harmful, or something our body assumes might be harmful when actually it's not.
Other cultures view dementia differently. Could they help us be better caregivers? BlurryMe/Shutterstock.com

Could different cultures teach us something about dementia?

More than 16 million people in the U.S. take care of people with dementia. Could we learn something from how other cultures view dementia as more of a social disease rather than a lonely one?
Marius Wernig, Thomas C. Südhof and their colleagues created these “Induced neuronal (iN) cells” from adult human blood cells. Marius Wernig

Neurons made from blood cells – a new tool for understanding brain diseases

Figuring out what causes diseases like autism, schizophrenia and depression is tricky. Now Stanford University researchers are turning blood into brain cells to study these diseases in a dish.
HIV becomes dormant in the body and can hide in brain cells. Joseph Lebowitz, Dr. Min Lin, and Dr. Habibeh Khoshboue

HIV lies dormant in brain, increasing risk of dementia, but how?

While drugs have been developed to treat HIV and AIDS, the virus can still lie dormant in the brain, increasing the risk for brain disease such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

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