Articles on 3-D printing

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Surgeons at the University of Saskatchewan use a 3D printed human brain to plan complex neurosurgical procedures for patients with movement disorders.

3D printers: A revolutionary frontier for medicine

From cheap prosthetic arms for landmine victims in Sudan to the promise of surgery on astronauts in space — 3D printing is sparking a healthcare revolution.
In school makerspaces, students problem-solve with traditional craft materials alongside. digital technologies such as 3D printing, virtual reality, programmable robots and video work.

How to help kids innovate from an early age

Creative makerspaces in Ontario schools weave passion with digital technologies to teach 21st century skills.
3D bioprinted channel, representing a blood vessel within a hydrogel that mimics human tissue. Forget, Heiny, Derme, Mitterberger, Shastri

The next pharmaceutical revolution could be 3D bioprinted

3D bioprinting of living cells and materials may contribute to faster and cheaper ways to create effective new drugs - and even reduce animal testing.
Marc in het Panhuis demonstrating that surfers require fins in their surfboards for stability and control during manoeuvres. Jones Beach Boardriders Club

Surfing the 3D printing wave: the changing face of surfboard fin production

3D printing looms as a gamechanger for the surfing industry as surfboard and fin technology become increasingly high-tech.
Many people in aged care facilities have swallowing disorders and particular dietary needs. from shutterstock.com

How 3D food printers could improve mealtimes for people with swallowing disorders

There's a lot to consider in the problem of creating enjoyable foods for people with swallowing difficulties. Could 3D-printed food be part of the solution?
University students experiment with human-robot interaction and autonomous manipulation, two elements of manufacturing’s future. Nikolaus Correll

To really help US workers, we should invest in robots

Today, the U.S. is leading the robotics revolution. But without timely investment, China will overtake us, and could permanently put Americans out of work.
Molecular machines are ready to join forces and take on real-world work. Chenfeng Ke

3-D printing turns nanomachines into life-size workers

Research on molecular machines won last year's Nobel Prize in chemistry. Now scientists have figured out a way to get these tiny molecules to join forces and collaborate on real work on a macro scale.
A solid, non-working Colt 1911 static model by TaylarRoids is printed on a household printer; is this a digital blueprint? Richard Matthews

The legal minefield of 3D printed guns

3D printing still exists in a legal grey area. This area is slowly being defined as courts prosecute the first cases but, is current copyright and criminal law keeping up with the technology?
A 3D printer creates a sophisticated geometric structure, developed by Silicon Valley startup Carbon. Reuters Staff

How 3D printing could disrupt Asia’s manufacturing economies

Objects of almost any shape or geometry can be produced by 3D printing. The technology could seriously disrupt not just manufacturing but related national plans for economic development.
A 3D model of the long-lost Scalopocynodon gracilis skull. Evolutionary Studies Unit, Wits University

3D technology brings a lost mammalian ancestor back to life

An old technique to explore the inside of fossils unfortunately ended up destroying some unique specimens. New technology has been used to reconstruct one such fossil.

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