Articles on Arctic

Displaying 1 - 20 of 73 articles

The word Eskimo signals negative and archaic stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Edmonton Eskimos is a racial slur and it’s time to stop using it

The use of the word Eskimos for a Canadian football team needs to end. It signals negative stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur.
Many homes in remote Indigenous communities rely on wood or diesel for heating. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Clean energy can advance Indigenous reconciliation

More than 200 remote communities in Canada rely on diesel fuel for energy. Cleaner options could fuel a better quality of life.
Marine waters are an important source of food for Inuit. (Judith Slein/Flickr)

Rocket debris is a risk to Inuit food security

The North Water Polynya, or Pikialasorsuag, is a key ocean area for Arctic animals and for Inuit hunting and fishing. Rocket launches threaten to contaminate the area with harmful chemicals.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami Natan Obed talk as they overlook Iqaluit, Nunavut in February. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Romantic notions about the Arctic must include Indigenous rights

The Arctic plays a big role in Canada's national identity. But as Canada's relationship with the region evolves, the interests of Indigenous peoples must be better-represented.
Jerry Natanine, community leader and former mayor of Clyde River, at a news conference in Ottawa in July following the Supreme Court of Canada ruling that upheld Inuit treaty rights in the Arctic. His lawyer and co-author Nader Hasan stands behind him. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Lessons from Supreme Court decisions on Indigenous consultation

The Supreme Court of Canada's recent decisions on Clyde River and Chippewas contain key lessons to ensure that Indigenous rights are recognized and respected in the future.
A polar bear suns herself on an ice floe on Baffin Bay in Nunavut. (Shutterstock)

What comes next for Clyde River after Supreme Court victory?

The Inuit town of Clyde River has won a long battle to stop Arctic seismic testing. The Supreme Court ruled the Inuit weren't adequately consulted. What does that mean for future consultations?
Muskoxen group together for security. Joel Berger

Scientist at work: Tracking muskoxen in a warming Arctic

How is rapid warming in the Arctic affecting animals that are adapted to cold? A wildlife biologist is using many techniques to find out, including stalking muskoxen in a polar bear costume.
An Arctic iceberg, pictured in 2015. This year, ice coverage has reached record lows for the early northern winter. AWeith/Wikimedia Commons

Yes, the Arctic’s freakishly warm winter is due to humans’ climate influence

The end of 2016 has brought balmy Arctic temperatures and record low ice extent for the time of year. It's a freak event even by modern standards, and climate models point the finger firmly at humans.
The world reacts to President-Elect Donald Trump. AP Photo/Marco Ugarte

Donald Trump and the world: Five challenges

America appears as divided over key aspects of foreign policy as it is at home. So how does President-elect Trump hope to handle that divide, and what will be the major issues facing him?
The crew of scientists prepare to put the drill stem into the Greenland ice sheet to probe water flows about a half of a mile below. Joel Harper

Scientist at work: Tracking melt water under the Greenland ice sheet

A glaciologist develops a lightweight method for probing the depths of Greenland's ice sheet to answer a crucial question: How fast is it melting?

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