Articles on Cats

Displaying 1 - 20 of 38 articles

An engorged female tick on the forehead of a dog. To get this big, they need to suck blood for about four days. While this is happening, the tick is injecting neurotoxins into the bloodstream. Rob Webster

Ticked off: let’s stop our dogs and cats dying of tick paralysis this year

Tick paralysis affect 10,000 dogs each year in eastern Australia, and the treatment can be very expensive. Fortunately, a new drug available is available.
More than 60% of Australian households include at least one companion animal, which are seen as family members by 88% of these. from www.shutterstock.com

With the rise of apartment living, what’s a nation of pet owners to do?

With a majority of households having pets and growing numbers living in apartments, a review of regulations on keeping animals in such communities is timely.
According to some surveys, more than 90% of owners view their pets as members of the family. 'Dog' via www.shutterstock.com

When is it ethical to euthanize your pet?

In the past, owners were quick to put their pets down. Now, with many viewing pets as family members, are they waiting too long?
There’s nothing feral about this Australian wildcat. Photograph by Angus Emmott

Let’s give feral cats their citizenship

There's been a lot of talk about killing feral cats, with the government's recently announced war on cats, with a goal to kill two million by 2020. But let's embrace cats as part of Australia's environment.
Feral cats are thought to be responsible for the decline of many Australian species. Melissa Jensen

The war on feral cats will need many different weapons

Feral cats are highly adaptable and highly variable, hence we must continue to search for their Achilles Heel and invest in a wide range of control methods.
Stoats (Mustela erminea), feral cats (Felis catus), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and black rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive predators in different parts of the world. Clockwise from top left: Sabec/commons.wikimedia.org (CC BY-SA 3.0); T Doherty; CSIRO/commons.wikimedia.org (CC BY 3.0); 0ystercatcher/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Killing cats, rats and foxes is no silver bullet for saving wildlife

Research published this week shows saving wildlife is much more complicated than killing introduced predators. Killing predators often doesn't work, and is sometimes actually worse for native wildlife.
Feral cats eat tens of millions of native animals in Australia every night. Another Eye

Feral feast: cats kill hundreds of Australian animals

Feral cats are estimated to eat tens of millions of native animals each night in Australia. But what kinds of wildlife are they eating? In research published today in the Journal of Biogeography, my colleagues…

Top contributors

More