Articles on Wildlife

Displaying 1 - 20 of 171 articles

A red fox listening for prey under the snow in Yellowstone National Park. Noise can affect foxes and other animals that rely on their hearing when they hunt. Neal Herbert/NPS

Human noise pollution is disrupting parks and wild places

A recent study finds that noise from human activities is intruding into many parks and other protected areas. Creating quiet zones and noise corridors can help reduce impacts from noise pollution.
It can be easier to raise money to aid animals like these African elephants than species that are more threatened with extinction but get humans less excited. www.shutterstock.com

Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction

Must the money raised to save wildlife always aid the most popular animals? New research suggests that marketing can persuade donors that northern hairy-nosed wombat lives matter too.
Aggressive behaviour exhibited by socially dominant Tasmanian devils may predispose them to infection with devil facial tumour disease. Sebastien Compte/University of Tasmania

Survival of the fittest? Perhaps not if you’re a Tasmanian devil

It's the Tasmanian devils that enjoy the highest survival and breeding success who're more likely to get the fatal facial tumour disease.
The Pinocchio anole lizard (Anolis probiscis) was first described in Ecuador in 1953, then believed to have become extinct until it was rediscovered in 2005. Javier Abalos Alvarez/Flickr

Will optimistic stories get people to care about nature?

'Doom and gloom' messages about nature are less effective than positive ones. The Lost & Found project tells the stories of creatures thought long gone but eventually rediscovered.
Part of a shipment of 33 rhino horns seized by Hong Kong customs, originated from Cape Town, South Africa. Bobby Yip /Reuters

Why is the illicit rhino horn trade escalating?

Rhino horn trade continues to be a highly lucrative business across the world.
Muskoxen group together for security. Joel Berger

Scientist at work: Tracking muskoxen in a warming Arctic

How is rapid warming in the Arctic affecting animals that are adapted to cold? A wildlife biologist is using many techniques to find out, including stalking muskoxen in a polar bear costume.
Red-breasted Nuthatches are irrupting this winter across North America. Heather Elaine Ritchie/Flickr

When birds go roaming: The mystery of avian irruptions

During bird irruptions, hundreds or thousands of a single species show up outside their normal territory. Most of what we know about irruptions comes from data collected by citizen scientists.
Bald eagles are the best-known example of a successful recovery under the Endangered Species Act. Jerry McFarland/Flickr

For endangered species, the road to recovery can be winding and bumpy

Critics say the Endangered Species Act does not work because only about 1 percent of protected species have officially "recovered." Two biologists explain why recovery is so hard to define.

Top contributors

More