Articles on Conservation

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A Tsaatan community in northern Mongolia, herding reindeer. (Shutterstock)

COP25 climate summit: Action must include divestment, decolonization and resistance

Who wins, who loses and whose natures are being talked about when nature-based solutions are proposed?
Australia is home to many new species, including wild camels found nowhere else on Earth.

Non-native species should count in conservation – even in Australia

Species counts drive conservation science and policy, yet a major component of biodiversity is excluded from the data: non-native species.
The Maria Fire billows above Santa Paula, California on Oct. 31. AP/Noah Berger

California is living America’s dystopian future

'California is America fast-forward,' writes one scholar. Does that mean that the dystopian infernos that have consumed parts of the state are simply a picture of what awaits the rest of America?
One in four of nearly 800 animals genetically tested were pure dingo. Michelle J Photography

Dingoes found in New South Wales, but we’re killing them as ‘wild dogs’

There is a myth that dingoes are extinct and wild dogs are all that remain in Australia. Our results show dingoes in New South Wales persist despite some mixing with domestic dogs.
Eastern-yellow robin. Some 60 per cent of the native birds of south-east mainland Australia have lost more than half of their natural habitat. Graham Winterflood/Wikimedia Commons

Most native bird species are losing their homes, even the ones you see every day

Aside from their intrinsic value, common bird species might be one of the only ways we connect with nature in our everyday lives. But these opportunities are under threat.
It’s all connected. Vasin Lee/Shutterstock

Why ‘acting locally’ is impossible in an interconnected world

What can we do as individuals to help save the planet? Acting locally is satisfying because we can see the results, but a geographer argues that large-scale solutions often make the most difference.
The New Zealand robin is a small and ordinary-looking songbird, but it can take down enormous invertebrate prey and hide morsels for later consumption. Supplied

A small New Zealand songbird that hides food for later use provides insights into cognitive evolution

The New Zealand robin has learnt to hide left-over food for later consumption, and it turns out that male birds with the best spatial memory have the greatest breeding success.

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