Articles on Environment

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The battle for the Franklin River runs far deeper than simply providing the backdrop for a political tug-of-war. PETER DOMBROVSKIS/ LIZ DOMBROVSKIS/AAP

Essays On Air: how archaeology helped save the Franklin River

Essays on Air: how archaeology helped save the Franklin River. The Conversation23.2 MB (download)
The battle to save the Franklin River - an exhilarating story of politics, cultural heritage and passionate environmentalism - captivated the nation in 1983.
Farmer-led development projects in places like Tanzania, shown here, can increase access to food and water, and reconnect people to nature. (Cecilia Schubert/flickr)

How to reduce poverty and re-connect people to nature

Farmer-led development work can improve people's lives, provide access to food and water - and re-connect them to nature.
Morning Mist Rock Island Bend, Franklin River, Southwest Tasmania. Peter Dombrovskis/ (courtesy Liz Dombrovskis) AAP

Friday essay: how archaeology helped save the Franklin River

The Franklin River campaign is commonly seen as a green victory; a fight for the right of 'wilderness' to exist. But archaeological research revealing the region's deep Aboriginal history was crucial to it.
Paris “under water” and other European cities facing drastic climate change should trigger planners to think urban spaces differently. S.Faric/Flickr

When climate comes unhinged, we need to re-think how to build our cities

In the future, Europe will suffer from more heat waves as well as extreme rainfall, presenting new challenges for planners and health care services. Building resilient cities can help.
Once we see the scale of issues like the climate change crisis, it can be difficult to imagine solutions. Collective reflection and alternative storytelling is one way to begin. Here: Youth leaders at the Climate March in New York City. (The Shore Line Project)

The Shore Line: A storybook for a sustainable future

Filmmaker Liz Miller discusses her collaborative, interactive documentary process and how storytelling might lead us to an alternative future through action and resistance.
The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency deleted — but later restored — key statistics on its web page about the percentage of Puerto Ricans living without drinking water and electricity. In this photo from October 2017, Roberto Figueroa Caballero sits in his wall-less home after Hurricane Maria devastated the island. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa, File)

Scientific information is the key to democracy

The U.S. government continues to wage a fight against scientific information. Without it, the public can do little to address environmental and economic inequality.

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