Articles on human-wildlife conflict

Displaying all articles

Red fox under cover of darkness in London. Jamie Hall. For use only with this article.

To avoid humans, more wildlife now work the night shift

It's becoming harder and harder for animals to find human-free spaces on the planet. New research suggests that to try to avoid people, mammals are shifting activity from the day to the nighttime.
Black tip sharks swim with tropical fish in a lagoon in French Polynesia. (Shutterstock)

Killing sharks, wolves and other top predators won’t solve conflicts

When humans have conflicts with wildlife, the first reaction is often to cull them. But there's little evidence to show that it works, and removing predators can even backfire and make things worse.
In the Serengeti wildebeest will move more than 2000km during their annual migration. Sarah Durant

Fences are an increasing threat to Africa’s migratory wildlife

Many mammals depend on large areas and trans-boundary conservation for their survival. When this is obstructed it can have a catastrophic impact on animal populations.
Coyote at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado. USFWS/Flickr

Why killing coyotes doesn’t make livestock safer

The US Department of Agriculture kills thousands of predators yearly, mainly for attacking livestock. A conservation biologist explains why this policy is ineffective and ecologically harmful.

Top contributors

More