DNA

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Men can deny paternity in when women they are involved with fall pregnant as a way of punishing the women. shutterstock

Why paternity tests should become cheaper and more widely accessible

When men deny the paternity of children, many South African women feel like they have no recourse. Making DNA tests affordable and accessible could change this.
A snip here, but not a snip there? DNA image via www.shutterstock.com

Why treat gene editing differently in two types of human cells?

The International Summit on Human Gene Editing drew a distinction between editing an individual's body cells and editing germline cells that would pass changes to future generations. Does that make sense?
Gene editing allows us to eliminate any misspellings, introduce beneficial natural variants, or perhaps cut out or insert new genes. Libertas Academica/Flickr

Why we can trust scientists with the power of new gene-editing technology

Should the gathering of experts from around the world that's considering the scientific, ethical, and governance issues linked to research into gene editing ring alarm bells?
Scientific evidence shows overwhelmingly that people across the world are genetic refugees from Africa. Shutterstock

How science has been abused through the ages to promote racism

Despite science refuting the existence of different human races, people have used "race" throughout history to divide and denigrate certain people while promoting their claims of superiority.
New forms of life are discovered in high-tech ways that leave yesterday’s natural history collections in the dust. Detective image via www.shutterstock.com.

The modern, molecular hunt for the world’s biodiversity

Forget the pith helmet and butterfly net. Discovering biodiversity now is much more about metagenomics and the 0's and 1's of digital databases.
Tomas Lindahl, pictured here in the lab, along with Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar, received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA

Nobel Prize in Chemistry highlights how our bodies can repair our fragile DNA

The recipients of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry showed that DNA is far from static. Rather, it is bombarded by damaging forces, but our bodies know how to repair these precious strands.

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