El Nino

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Rural southern Australia has been drying out over the past several decades. Pictured here, Burra in South Australia. David Jones

Hasta la vista El Niño – but don’t hold out for ‘normal’ weather just yet

Australia is the land of drought of flooding rains, driven by events such as El Nino. But despite this variability, some parts of Australia are clearly drying out.
Hurricane Pali churns over the eastern Pacific on January 11. NASA Earth Observatory

Why are hurricanes forming in January?

January hurricanes are rare events, but two have already formed this month. Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel explains the conditions that generated Pali and Alex.
Homeless in Los Angeles: Bernard Leatherhood (62) and Arthur Johnson (72). Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

How the homeless population is changing: it’s older and sicker

Field research in Oakland highlights a major issue that Americans have yet to face up to: how to deal with growing numbers of homeless older people in our streets.
Extreme drought, a predictable impact of El Niño, fuels wildfires on the island of Borneo on October 14. NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL-Caltech, MISR Team

What North America can expect from El Niño

The third-ever 'super' El Niño is under way. Here's how it will affect your region in the US and how global warming affects this and future El Niños.
Despite a decade of drought and declining rainfall in parts of Australia, there’s still plenty of water to go around. Maroondah reservoir from www.shutterstock.com

Declining rainfall in parts of Australia, but still plenty of water available: BOM report

The Millennium Drought ended more than five years ago, but several years of below-average rainfall and El Niño have brought drought back to many parts of Australia. Our latest report on water in Australia shows rainfall is continuing to decline in eastern Australia and increase in the north.
Mountains overlooking the Hex river valley in the Western Cape, South Africa. The country has been experiencing inclement weather this summer. EPA/Nic Bothma

The three culprits behind South Africa’s weird weather patterns

South Africa has been experiencing odd weather patterns during the month of November. It can be attributed to three culprits.
While firefighters battled widespread fires in New South Wales in October 2013, hundreds of thousands of people turned to social media and smartphone apps for vital updates. AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts

Crisis communication: saving time and lives in disasters through smarter social media

When disaster strikes, more people than ever are turning to social media to find out if they're in danger. But Australian emergency services need to work together more to learn what works to save lives.
There were no fatalities from Hurricane Patricia, which was downgraded to a tropical storm after making landfall in Mexico. Tomas Bravo/Reuters

Did El Niño give Hurricane Patricia more kick?

Research shows that El Niño creates conditions for a certain type of hurricane – and offers clues as to how climate change can affect the severity of hurricanes.
Photosynthesis is crucial to the ability of plants to convert sunlight into energy. N i c o l a/Flickr

PM’s Prize for Science for revealing nature’s solar power

Distinguished Professor Graham Farquhar has received this year's Prime Minister's Prize for Science for his pioneering research into photosynthesis.

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