Articles on Foreign fighters

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Australia has enacted 20 new anti-terror laws since 2014. Several more bills have been introduced by Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton and are now before parliament. James Ross/AAP

Australia has enacted 82 anti-terror laws since 2001. But tough laws alone can’t eliminate terrorism

Australia now has one of the most comprehensive ranges of anti-terrorism laws of any Western democracy. It's time to think creatively about solutions, rather than continually reworking old strategies.
Nadia Murad, co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize, listens to a question at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Why Canada must prosecute returning ISIS fighters

If Canada truly stands for multiculturalism, pluralism, the rule of law, global justice, human rights and the liberal international order, we must prosecute our citizens who have fought with ISIS.
Tunisians demonstrate against the return of jihadists fighting for extremist groups abroad Reuters/Zoubeir Souissi

Integrating radical fighters who return home isn’t easy, but can be done

Trying to reintegrate foreign fighters who return home shouldn't be considered the soft option. Governments in countries like Morocco and Tunisia need to respond realistically to a complex problem.
Under proposed changes, the war crime of murder would not apply to collateral civilian deaths resulting from an otherwise lawful attack. EPA/Zouhir Al Shimale

Australia’s proposed war crimes amendments demand careful scrutiny

Under proposed changes, the war crime offence of murder, in a non-international armed conflict, would not apply to collateral civilian deaths resulting from an otherwise lawful attack.
Karen Nettleton, whose daughter and grandchildren are currently in Syria, has a made a public plea for her family to be allowed to return to Australia. ABCTV

Even Khaled Sharrouf’s family has the right to come home

Whatever we think of the family of foreign fighter Khaled Sharrouf or their circumstances, they enjoy the right to return on the same footing as every other Australian citizen.
If their deaths fighting for Islamic State in Iraq are confirmed, Khaled Sharrouf and Mohamed Elomar would be far from the first foreign fighters to be killed in the history of combat. Facebook

Foreign fighters aren’t a new problem, so heed history’s lessons

Foreign fighters have always posed a dual challenge: how to stop them going and what to do if they return. History offers lessons on managing these problems, including that it's hard to stop them leaving.
The Abbott government has announced a plan to strip dual nationals involved in terrorism of their Australian citizenship. AAP/Lukas Coch

Proposals to strip citizenship take Australia a step further than most

A number of countries – including Canada, France, the US and the UK – allow for the deprivation of citizenship on national security grounds. But the scope of ministerial discretion varies significantly.

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