Articles on Law

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Jean Truchon, right, looks on as lawyer Jean-Pierre Menard gives their reaction to a Québec judge overturning parts of provincial and federal laws on medically assisted dying on September 12, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

The latest medical assistance in dying decision needs to be appealed: Here’s why

One judge must not be allowed to curtail parliament’s power to promote broader societal interests and protect people who are elderly, ill and disabled.
Indonesian women participate in a rally for equal rights outside the Presidential Palace in Jakarta, Indonesia, in March 2017. Bagus Indahono/EPA

How a populist morality movement is blocking a law against sexual violence in Indonesia: analysis

Indonesia's populist morality movement considers talking about eliminating sexual violence against women is the same as supporting women’s right to have sex outside of marriage.
Grata Flos Greig, First Female Law Graduate, c1904, University of Melbourne. Flos was the first woman admitted to the Australian legal profession. University of Melbourne Archives, UMA/I/5131

Hidden women of history: Flos Greig, Australia’s first female lawyer and early innovator

When Flos Greig first entered law school, it was illegal for women to become lawyers. Undeterred, she lobbied for change and became the first woman admitted to the legal profession in Australia.
U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens winds up to throw out the first pitch before the start of the Chicago Cubs game on Sept. 14, 2005. AP Photo/Jeff Roberson

Justice Stevens, Babe Ruth and the best law clerk assignment ever

Former US Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens passed away on July 16. One of his former law clerks recalls her most memorable assignment.
Tribal members in a jirga, or circle – one traditional avenue for justice in Afghanistan. Lizette Potgieter/Shutterstock

Afghanistan: how to widen access to justice

In countries where people access different justice providers, a hybrid model could pull them together and ensure better oversight and human rights.
Ontario budget provisions aiming to limit Crown liability would also apply retroactively, thereby extinguishing existing lawsuits, including a class action by juvenile inmates who were placed in solitary confinement. Ye Jinghan/Unsplash

Ontario government seeking to insulate itself from lawsuits

Proposed new legislation in Ontario will make it much harder to sue the provincial government for its negligence or bad faith.

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