Articles on Justice

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The #MeToo movement and more recent allegations against Brett Kavanaugh have posed questions about past conduct. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File

How should we judge people for their past moral failings?

Whether the sins of our past stay with us forever has become a pertinent question of our time. A philosopher argues we don't need to carry our past burdens – although there are some moral conditions.
Protester one year after Occupy Wall Street. Glenn Halog/Flickr

Survey: Social justice divides Americans

The support for the key values that pervade the discourse about social justice is overall very strong but it may be surprising that democracy and solidarity receive less support among respondents.
The courts are, or can be, theatres of remorse. Shutterstock

Friday essay: how do you measure remorse?

In many legal jurisdictions of the world, including Australia, an offender’s remorse is a mitigating factor at sentencing. And yet how judges evaluate such expressions is unclear.
Use of IT in courts could help make justice more efficient. But would it be fair? Shutterstock

Predicting justice: what if algorithms entered the courthouse?

Big data and algorithmic applications could transform how our legal institutions work, but the digital revolution must keep the needs of judges, attorneys and especially citizens at its heart.
How do survivors find healing? Chum Mey, a survivor of the Khmer Rouge regime, walks past a portrait of Nuon Chea, a former Khmer Rouge leader. AP Photo/Heng Sinith

Bearing witness to Cambodia’s horror, 20 years after Pol Pot’s death

The accounts of survivors of Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge show how they were able to find justice and healing by breaking their silence and speaking on behalf of those who were killed.
Six memorial candles are lit during a Holocaust Remembrance Day ceremony at Sharkey Theater on board Naval Station Pearl Harbor. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James E. Foehl

Why remembering matters for healing

Remembrance days and memorials provide people the opportunity to share stories with a community. An expert explains how that can make a difference.
Australian governments have too often succumbed to perceived community pressure to limit parole authorities’ independence and powers. AAP/Samantha Manchee

Political interventions have undermined the parole system’s effectiveness and independence

Government and judicial interventions into the decisions of parole boards display a progressive loss of faith in these independent bodies.
In a 2016 ABS survey, one in two women reported having experienced sexual harassment, but 90% of them did not contact the police. Cindy Zhi/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

#MeToo exposes legal failures, but ‘trial by Twitter’ isn’t one of them

Critics say that #MeToo has turned the legal principle of innocent until proven guilty on its head, but such comments privilege the rights of perpetrators over justice for victims.

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