Memory

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Does your mum list all your siblings' names before she gets to yours? Don’t worry, she doesn’t love them more. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Peter, Paul, Kylie … David! Why we forget family members' names

How often has your own mother forgotten your name? Does she ever cycle through the names of each of your siblings – and perhaps even the family pet – before getting to yours?
The brain processes different facial features separately, so how does it tie them together? Shutterstock

How our modular brain pieces the world together

Different parts of our brains process different things, like the facial features, voices and the gait of people we know. But it takes memory to weave them all together into a single picture.
Traumatic events can stop the brain storing the context in which they took place. www.shutterstock.com

The possible cause of flashbacks discovered

Brain imaging study shows that we forget the context in which a traumatic event take place which could be crucial to avoiding negative loops.
Psychogenic fugue – when you can’t remember anything from your past. www.shutterstock.com

Memory loss: it’s not all amnesia

People lose their memory in many different ways. A neuropsychologist explains the lingo.
When we’re flooded with images, how much of their content do we retain? Penelope Umbrico, '541,795 Suns from Sunsets from Flickr (Partial) 01/23/06,' 2006-ongoing, detail, 2500 4 inch x 6 inch c-prints. Courtesy Mark Moore Gallery and Bruce Silverstein Gallery.

Exposed to a deluge of digital photos, we’re feeling the psychological effects of image overload

Snapping and sharing photographs has never been easier. But being inundated with images can have a host of unintended consequences, from heightened anxiety to impaired memory.
Magda Szubanski in one of her most famous roles - Sharon Strzelecki - in Kath and Kim, with actors Gina Riley, Peter Rowsthorn, Glenn Robbins and Jane Turner. Paul Jeffers/AAP

Magda Szubanski’s Reckoning: A Memoir

Magda Szubanski’s engaging debut memoir, Reckoning, is an exercise in precisely that: reconciling the past. It is also a celebration of the life and career of one of our greatest comedians.
A young American celebrates the historic news of August 9, 1974. flickr/Pip R. Lagenta

The politics of public memory, from Watergate to Iraq

An individual may remember and forget what he or she likes, but once a version of past events is accepted and shared by a group, as a collective construction, it is on public record.
We’re more likely to recall memories and information we’ve used frequently rather than those obtained at a particular age. Kristo-Gothard Hunor/Shutterstock

Passage of time: why people with dementia switch back to the past

People with dementia judge the passage of time differently, and can access remote memories from many decades ago while being unable to remember events of the past few hours.

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