Articles on Namibia

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Presidents Jacob Zuma and Uhuru Kenyatta. Their countries are at the forefront of efforts to have Africa leave the ICC. GCIS

Exiting the ICC: South Africa betrays the world and its own history

Ironically the campaign to withdraw from the ICC was mainly initiated by the very same governments and heads of state that had earlier referred cases to the ICC when it suited their own interests.
Rwanda’s President Paul Kagame is seen as having promoted economic growth at the expense of human rights. Ruben Sprich/Reuters

There is good as well as bad news about the state of governance in Africa

To improve, African countries need to find a balance between political and economic matters. This is where leadership becomes particularly important. But this is currently lacking on the continent.
Members of the Non-Aligned Movement meet at the session of the 17th summit of heads of state and government. DIRCO

Explainer: the Non-Aligned Movement in the 21st century

The Non-Aligned Movement member states enjoy cohesion on few issues. Historically, their heterogeneity ranged from absolute monarchs to socialist presidents.
Dehorning is practised on many South African private reserves and is seen as a way of deterring poachers. Keith Somerville

Dehorning rhinos: why there may be a case for doing it

A few national parks and reserves want to dehorn rhinos and there is a lobby for a regulated and closely monitored legal trade in rhino horn. But this is met by opposition from many.
Hair speaks of the past, and of cultural heritage. Steve Evans/Flickr

The heritage of hair: stories of resilience and creativity

Hair has long been modified for aesthetic and other ends. But skewed power structures have meant that women, particularly women of colour, have borne the brunt of stereotyping and prejudice.
Kenya burned 105 tonnes of ivory confiscated from smugglers and poachers, an action denounced by Bostwana as wrong and wasteful. Reuters/Siegfried Modola

EU’s new stand on ivory trade upsets East Africa ahead of key decision

EU officials argue that while the ban on ivory trade is right for some countries, it shouldn't be all-encompassing. It has called on African range states to reach agreement on the issue.
Idyllic Mauritius is the only African country ranked in the favourable category of ‘more stable’ in the latest survey on state fragility. Reuters/Darrin Zammit Lupi

Is the Fragile States Index ‘fatally flawed’?

The Fragile States Index leaves more questions than it answers. Like similar global surveys, its credibility hinges on reliable data. But how sound are its statistics and their interpretation?
Outgoing UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s successor faces the challenge of making the organisation more accountable. UN

What can be done to stop the United Nations abusing its immunity

The ‘functional immunity’ granted to UN officials made good sense when the body was founded after World War II. But as its organisational functions have expanded, so has this immunity.
Deputy chief justice Dikgang Moseneke, left, and. chief justice Mogoeng Mogoeng at a special session to mark Moseneke’s retirement. GCIS

South Africa marks the end of a remarkable judicial career

The retirement of Dikgang Moseneke, one of South Africa's eminent judges and the Constitutional Court's deputy chief justice, is a moment to reflect on the court's place in society and his legacy.
Ethiopians reading newspapers in the capital Addis Ababa. The country’s media is among the most repressed on the continent. Reuters/Tiksa Negeri

Press freedom violations undermine African Union’s vision of transparency

Press freedom has changed little in the past decade. If the African Union is to commit to the principles of democracy, it needs to do more to uphold freedom of expression and protects its journalists.
Crowds cheer as Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe arrives to address the country’s Independence Day celebrations in Harare. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

What Africa’s most newly independent states did with 22 years of freedom

Namibia's new elite has used "affirmative action" for self-enrichment, while the majority of the population remains excluded from its the wealth. Meanwhile, Zimbabwe's socio-economic woes continue.

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