Sharks

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Loving our monsters? We’ll learn more by researching sharks than by kiling them. ScreenWest/AAP

Relax, shark numbers aren’t booming, but more research can make us safer

The best way to guard against shark attacks is to study them, not kill them. Because while the alleged "shark boom" almost certainly not real, the more we know about sharks, the better.
Choosing to swim or surf at a beach with shark spotters or lifeguards may save you a limb or your life. Glencairn Leigh de Necker

Four useful tips on how to be shark smart this summer

Despite low shark attack numbers, many people are afraid of being bitten. There are, however, ways to steer clear of these creatures.
A greynurse shark complete with a tracking device - scientifically the best way to keep tabs on what sharks are up to. AAP Image/NSW Ministery for Agriculture and Fisheries

Mike Baird is right, culling sharks doesn’t work – here’s what we can do instead

Calls are growing louder for a shark cull in New South Wales. But like in Western Australia, which infamously experimented with culling last year, a NSW cull would harm sharks while failing to protect people.
Australian surfer Mick Fanning, seen here surfing at Snapper Rocks on the Gold Coast, has decided to change the colour of his surfboard. No more yellow. AAP Image/Jesse Little

Mick Fanning changes his surfboard colour from ‘yum yum yellow’

The recent shark attack was enough to convince Australian surfer Mick Fanning that the colour of his surfboard may have been a factor. But what do sharks actually see in the water?
A great white shark captured off the coast of Mexico. Flickr/Brook Ward

No bones about it: sharks evolved cartilage for a reason

We used to think of sharks as primitive fish because the had cartilage instead of bones. Turns out there was a good reason why and it makes them anything but primitive.
Loggerhead turtle populations are facing a brighter future, but many other species are still in decline, while for others there are no data at all. AAP Image/Lauren Bath

We’ve only monitored a fraction of the Barrier Reef’s species

The Great Barrier Reef is home to some 1,600 species of bony fish, 130 sharks and rays, and turtles, mammals and more. Most have had no population monitoring, meaning we don't know how well they are faring.

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