Articles on Turkey

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A woman casts her vote at a polling station in the southeastern Turkey Kurdish stronghold of Diyarbakir on March 31, 2019 during the local elections to elect the mayors for 30 large metropolitan cities, 51 provincial capitals and 922 districts. Ilyas AKENGIN / AFP

What we need to learn about gender parity in Turkey’s Kurdish municipalities

As the number of women in politics increase, more women's voices will be heard: the example of co-mayorship in Turkey is a first step.
Journalist Jamal Khashoggi at a 2014 press conference in Bahrain. AP/Hasan Jamali

Why Jamal Khashoggi’s murder took place in a consulate

Jamal Khashoggi's brutal murder happened at a consulate, a space not subject to the laws of the host country, Turkey. That means the alleged murderers did not fear interference by local authorities.
Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro created a new cryptocurrency called the ‘Petro’ to combat hyperinflation. Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Is authoritarianism bad for the economy? Ask Venezuela – or Hungary or Turkey

When an elected leader turns autocratic, the economy tends to suffer. That's because, in a functioning democracy, economic policy is made jointly, with lawmakers playing a key role.
In this December 2009 file photo, a member of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, trains on a weapon at their camp in the Qandil mountains near the Turkish border with northern Iraq. (AP Photo/Yahya Ahmed)

The elusive quest for peace between the Turks and the Kurds

Why did negotiations between the Turkish state and the Kurds, aimed at mitigating ethnic conflict and bringing about peace, fail in Turkey?
Women hold signs as they take part in a demonstration against government plans to ban or limit the practice of abortion in Turkey on 22 June 2012, in Istanbul. Reuters

Debate: When abortion is ‘haram’, women find strategies to claim their rights

Abortion appears to be illegal and clandestine in large parts of the Muslim world. Yet, women continue to challenge the status quo and archaic laws through their daily practices and activism.
President Vladimir Putin of Russia, Hassan Rouhani of Iran and Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, following their meeting in Tehran, Iran, Sept. 7, 2018. Reuters/Kirill Kudryavtsev/Pool

The US will have to accept second-class status in the Middle East

The US was once the dominant force in the Middle East. That old order has disappeared. Now the new powers are Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Russia – and the US needs a new policy for the region.

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