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Articles on Richard Nixon

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The gate to former President Donald Trump’s home at Mar-A-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., on Aug. 8, 2022. Photo by Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images

How the FBI knew what to search for at Mar-a-Lago – and why the Presidential Records Act is an essential tool for the National Archives and future historians

A presidential scholar sets the history and context for the battle over President Trump’s official records – and says it isn’t the first records battle between the government and a former president.
Two political conservatives, Greg Jacob, former counsel to Vice President Mike Pence, and Michael Luttig, a retired judge who was an adviser to Pence, testified to the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol attack . AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Jan. 6 committee hearings show what went right, not just what went wrong

Coverage of the House Jan. 6 hearings focuses on what went wrong that led up to Trump supporters’ laying siege to the US Capitol. A government scholar looks at what went right, both then and now.
U.S. President Richard Nixon at a White House lectern reading a farewell speech to his staff following his resignation on Aug. 9, 1974. George Tames/New York Times Co./Getty Images

Woodward and Bernstein didn’t bring down a president in Watergate – but the myth that they did lives on

Washington Post reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward broke stories about the Watergate scandal that helped unravel Richard Nixon’s presidency. But they were not the sole force to bring him down.
A video image shows the U.S. Capitol grounds being breached as the House Jan. 6 committee holds its first public hearing. Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP

Jan. 6 hearing gives primetime exposure to violent footage and dramatic evidence – the question is, to what end?

The House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol held its first hearing to present what it has learned during its almost year-long probe. Three scholars analyze the event.
Chairman of the Senate Watergate Committee Sam Ervin sits with Chief Counsel Sam Dash, Sen. Howard Baker, staffer Rufus Edmiston and others as they listen to a witness during the Watergate hearings. Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

What 5 previous congressional investigations can teach us about the House Jan. 6 committee hearings

The public hearings of the House Jan. 6 investigative committee will deal with unprecedented events in American history, but the very investigation of these events has strong precedent.
A view of the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C. John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images

How ‘gate’ became the syllable of scandal

Many of the coinages fail to differentiate the mundane from the momentous. Has the suffix’s overuse rendered it essentially meaningless?
Wearing his military uniform, Jackie Robinson signs a contract on Oct. 23, 1945 to becomes the first Black to play with a white professional baseball team. Bettmann/Getty Images

Jackie Robinson was a Republican until the GOP became the ‘white man’s party’

Like millions of other Blacks during the first half of the 20th Century, legendary baseball player Jackie Robinson was a republican. That changed when the GOP opposed voting rights for Blacks.
Making history: US president Richard Nixon meeting Chinese leader Mao Zedong in Beijing in1972. White House Photo Office Collection (Nixon Administration)

Nixon-Mao meeting: four lessons from 50 years of US-China relations

Richard Nixon’s visit sparked a new era of collaboration but now the relationship between US and China is beginning to unravel.
Critics of President Joe Biden have accused him of lying. Most American presidents have been accused of deception. Win McNamee/Getty Images

All American presidents have lied – the question is why and when

A political philosopher argues that while all American presidents may lie, those who appear to lie for the public good are often celebrated.
A man protesting in New York City one year after the violent insurrection in Washington, D.C. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Prosecuting Trump would inevitably be political – and other countries have had mixed success in holding ex-presidents accountable

Criminal charges against former President Donald Trump for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot could spark political consequences – not only for Trump, but for US democracy.
Security fences stand near the U.S. Capitol on January 5, 2022. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How democracy gets eroded – lessons from a Nixon expert

The January 6, 2021, Capitol riot happened a year ago. But the attempt to disrupt the peaceful transfer of power was just one part of a larger, and more long-term, attempt to undo US democracy.
U.S. Reps. Bennie Thompson and Liz Cheney, chair and vice chair of the committee investigating the Capitol insurrection, after voting to hold Steve Bannon in criminal contempt. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Steve Bannon is held in criminal contempt of Congress, pushing key question over presidential power to the courts

Donald Trump asked his former presidential aides not to testify before a congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection – testing the limits of congressional oversight.
Nixon resigned after tapes he had fought making public incriminated him in the Watergate coverup. Bettmann/Getty

Trump wants the National Archives to keep his papers away from investigators – post-Watergate laws and executive orders may not let him

Donald Trump’s lawsuit to stop the release to Congress of potentially embarrassing or incriminating documents puts the National Archives in the middle of an old legal conflict.
In the early 1960s, Barry Goldwater, a Republican U.S. senator from Arizona, called for the GOP to adopt racist principles. AP Photo/Henry Burroughs

Texas voting law builds on long legacy of racism from GOP leaders

For much of the country’s history, the Republican Party was the party of Lincoln and racial equality, and the Democratic Party backed Jim Crow laws and white supremacy. The two parties switched.
U.S. soldiers stand guard along the perimeter of the international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. Hundreds of Western nationals and Afghan workers have been flown to safety since the Taliban reasserted control over the country, but still in hiding are Afghans who tried to build a fledgling democracy. (AP Photo/Shekib Rahmani)

How Afghanistan is — and isn’t — Vietnam all over again

The Vietnam War was the defining issue for Joe Biden’s generation. His botched withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan could be the defining act of his presidency.

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