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Articles on Bill Clinton

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Good old days: Before the coronavirus hit, governors, like California’s Gavin Newsom, had easier jobs. AP/Rich Pedroncelli, Pool

Plummeting tax revenues will put governors in tough budget situations

As Congress considers further financial help for victims of the coronavirus pandemic, the magnitude of the fiscal crisis that governors and their states will have to face is just starting to emerge.
President Donald Trump holds up a newspaper to show a headline that reads, ‘Acquitted,’ at the 68th annual National Prayer Breakfast, in Washington D.C.. AP Photo/ Evan Vucci

National Prayer Breakfast was a moment for leaders to show humility – Trump changed it

The National Prayer Breakfast has been a time to forge friendships. But, as a scholar says, Trump used it to praise his accomplishments, malign his enemies, and thank God for being on his side.
Benny Marty/Shutterstock.com

US and Iran have a long, troubled history

Some of the major events in US-Iran relations highlight the differences between the nations' views, but others presented real opportunities for reconciliation.
Kamala Harris’ campaign fizzled as her past as a prosecutor haunted her candidacy. AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

How being ‘tough on crime’ became a political liability

More and more district attorney candidates are running on reversing the government's traditional approach to crime and punishment. And they’re winning.
Donald Trump is no Richard Nixon. And that’s why he’ll never willingly leave office in 2020. (The Associated Press)

Trump will cling to power — and Republicans will cling to him

Trump will survive the impeachment process in 2020, no matter what malfeasance comes to light. The Republicans will protect their man at all costs.
The Capitol on the morning after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced the House of Representatives will vote on a resolution to affirm the impeachment investigation. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Impeachment resolution: 3 reasons the House voted even though the Constitution doesn’t require it

The House of Representatives voted Thursday on a resolution that laid out a process for the inquiry into the impeachment of President Donald Trump. But was the resolution constitutionally necessary?
Perot become a household name after making an independent run for president in 1992. AP Photo/Doug Mills

The ‘giant sucking sound’ of NAFTA: Ross Perot was ridiculed as alarmist in 1992 but his warning turned out to be prescient

As the US prepares to replace NAFTA, a labor scholar who was critical of Perot but shared concerns about the deal revisits the claim that helped him become the most successful third-party candidate since Teddy Roosevelt.
President Donald Trump arriving at the Rose Garden, May 22, 2019, in Washington. AP/Evan Vucci

The Constitution dictates that impeachment must not be partisan

Politics have pervaded the debate about whether Congress should impeach President Trump. One legal scholar says that whether to impeach – or not – should not be viewed as a political question.
Special counsel Robert Mueller reached no definitive conclusion about whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice in firing FBI Director James Comey or attacking his own investigation. Reuters/Hyungwon Kang, AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Reuters/Jonathan Ernst, Twitter

Trump and obstruction of justice: An explainer

Legally, a person can obstruct justice even if he committed no other crime – though it is harder to prove. It all depends on the intent behind pressuring investigators, say, or firing an FBI director.
A television set turned on in the West Wing of the White House. AP Photo/Susan Walsh

A brief history of presidential lethargy

Calvin Coolidge, during one stretch of his presidency, was getting 15 hours of shut-eye each day, while William Howard Taft was known for nodding off during public events.

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