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Articles on Stars

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With the proper equipment, you can enjoy the beauty of the night sky. Allexxandar via iStock/GettyImages

5 ways families can enjoy astronomy during the pandemic

COVID-19 may have messed up school and shut down a lot of entertainment venues. But you can still brighten things up by doing a little stargazing at night, an astronomer says.
Artist’s interpretation of the inside of the Sun. James Josephides, CAS Swinburne University of Technology

Curious Kids: what does the Sun’s core look like?

If you could go right into the middle of the Sun, everything would be incredibly bright - and perhaps a little bit pink.
Light trails left in the sky (photographed with a long exposure time), by Starlink satellites, seen from New Mexico, USA. Mike Lewinski/Flickr

The costly collateral damage from Elon Musk’s Starlink satellite fleet

By 2025 Elon Musk wants to launch 12,000 satellites and corner the global Internet market. What will be lost is earth-based astronomy, the idea that space belongs to us all and the beauty of a starry sky.
Woodcut from Camille Flammarion’s 1888 book L'Atmosphère : météorologie populaire. The caption reads: ‘A missionary of the Middle Ages tells that he had found the point where the sky and the Earth touch’ and continues, ‘What is there, then, in this blue sky, which certainly exists, and which veils the stars during the day?’ Wikipedia

Einstein’s two mistakes

Albert Einstein may have been the ultimate example of a visionary genius, but that did not stop him from twice losing his way due to beliefs that were perhaps not so scientific.
The Parkes radio telescope can detect extremely weak signals coming from the most distant parts of the Universe. Shutterstock

The Dish in Parkes is scanning the southern Milky Way, searching for alien signals

The Dish in Parkes is scanning the southern Milky Way, searching for alien signals. The Conversation50.7 MB (download)
Today we hear about the Parkes radio telescope's role in the search for alien life. Our guide is the irrepressible John Sarkissian, the scientist who's had his eye on The Dish since childhood.
Stars come into existence because of a powerful force of nature called gravity. ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

Curious Kids: how are stars made?

Stars begin their life inside very large, fluffy clouds of space dust and gas called nebulae.

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