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Articles sur Afghanistan

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In this March 2019 photo, Afghan artists work on a barrier wall of the Ministry of Women’s Affairs marking International Women’s Day, in Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Women negotiators in Afghan/Taliban peace talks could spur global change

Without women’s inclusion and meaningful participation, any peace agreement between Afghanistan and the Taliban will lack legitimacy.
Long time there: U.S. troops maneuver around the central part of the Baghran river valley as they search for remnants of Taliban and al-Qaida forces on Feb. 24, 2003. Aaron Favila/Pool/AP Photo

US postpones Afghanistan troop withdrawal in hopes of sustaining peace process: 5 essential reads

The Afghanistan War now has an end date: 9/11/21. Experts explain the history of US involvement in Afghanistan, the peace process to end that conflict and how the country's women are uniquely at risk.
President Joko Widodo (foreground, second from right), flanked by then Vice President Jusuf Kalla, welcomes Afghan and Pakistani mullahs to the Trilateral Ulema Conference held at Bogor Palace in West Java, Indonesia. Wahyu Putro A/Antara Foto

Indonesia seeks nothing in return for its global peace and foreign aid efforts. It should

Indonesia needs to consider long-term engagement to produce deeper and more sustainable impacts.
Audience members listen to Afghan parliamentarian Fawzia Koofi speak in 2014. Women’s access to politics increased greatly after the Taliban’s 2001 ouster. Sha Marai/AFP via Getty Images

Women in Afghanistan worry peace accord with Taliban extremists could cost them hard-won rights

Afghan women interviewed about current talks between the government and the Taliban say, 'There is no going back.' Taliban fundamentalist rule in the 1990s forced women into poverty and subservience.
Taliban militants and Afghan civilians celebrate the signing of a peace deal with the United States on March 2. Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images)

The Taliban are megarich – here’s where they get the money they use to wage war in Afghanistan

Because the Taliban's insurgency is so well financed, the Afghan government must spend enormous sums on war, too. A peace accord would free up funds for basic services, economic development and more.
Australian soldiers in the trenches at Anzac Cove on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey in 1915. State Library of Victoria/Wikimedia Commons

The Anzac legend has blinded Australia to its war atrocities. It’s time for a reckoning

When the honour of Australia’s revered soldiers is questioned, so, too, is the national self-image. But war is an ugly business, and we pay a price for tethering it so tightly to our identity.

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