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Articles sur Taliban

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In this March 2019 photo, Afghan artists work on a barrier wall of the Ministry of Women’s Affairs marking International Women’s Day, in Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Women negotiators in Afghan/Taliban peace talks could spur global change

Without women’s inclusion and meaningful participation, any peace agreement between Afghanistan and the Taliban will lack legitimacy.
Long time there: U.S. troops maneuver around the central part of the Baghran river valley as they search for remnants of Taliban and al-Qaida forces on Feb. 24, 2003. Aaron Favila/Pool/AP Photo

US postpones Afghanistan troop withdrawal in hopes of sustaining peace process: 5 essential reads

The Afghanistan War now has an end date: 9/11/21. Experts explain the history of US involvement in Afghanistan, the peace process to end that conflict and how the country's women are uniquely at risk.
Audience members listen to Afghan parliamentarian Fawzia Koofi speak in 2014. Women’s access to politics increased greatly after the Taliban’s 2001 ouster. Sha Marai/AFP via Getty Images

Women in Afghanistan worry peace accord with Taliban extremists could cost them hard-won rights

Afghan women interviewed about current talks between the government and the Taliban say, 'There is no going back.' Taliban fundamentalist rule in the 1990s forced women into poverty and subservience.
Taliban militants and Afghan civilians celebrate the signing of a peace deal with the United States on March 2. Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images)

The Taliban are megarich – here’s where they get the money they use to wage war in Afghanistan

Because the Taliban's insurgency is so well financed, the Afghan government must spend enormous sums on war, too. A peace accord would free up funds for basic services, economic development and more.
Members of the Taliban delegation attend the opening session of the peace talks with the Afghan government, Doha, Qatar, Sept. 12, 2020. Karim Jaafar/AFP via Getty Images

Afghanistan peace talks begin – but will the Taliban hold up their end of the deal?

In February, the US signed an accord with the Taliban to end the Afghanistan War. Now Taliban insurgents are meeting with the Afghan government – but peace remains an uncertain outcome.
Afghan security personnel inspect the rubble of Afghanistan’s intelligence services building after a car bomb blast claimed by the Taliban killed at least 11 people, July 13, 2020. AFP via Getty Images

Afghanistan’s peace process is stalled. Can the Taliban be trusted to hold up their end of the deal?

In February, the US signed an historic accord with the Taliban to end the Afghanistan War. Now violence in the country is up and peace talks with the government are delayed yet again.
New Afghan National Army recruits march during their February graduation ceremony. AP Photo/Rahmat Gul

There’s no easy exit for the US in Afghanistan

The US is taking an untraditional approach in its peace talks with the Taliban. The new deal does not contain many of the elements that are typically key to a successful peace negotiation.
US Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad and Taliban co-founder Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar sign an agreement ending the US’s 18-year war in Afghanistan, Doha, Feb. 29, 2020. GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP via Getty Images

After US and Taliban sign accord, Afghanistan must prepare for peace

A peace deal with the Taliban has been signed. But rebuilding Afghanistan after three decades of conflict will take much more than an accord, says a scholar of peacebuilding.

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