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Articles sur Marine life

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Archaeologists and marine scientists must work together with Indigenous communities and policy makers to protect Australia’s cultural heritage above and below the sea. Sam Wright

Australia’s coastal waters are rich in Indigenous cultural heritage, but it remains hidden and under threat

With 300 stone artefacts submerged on Australia’s continental shelf last year, Indigenous underwater cultural heritage needs to be prioritised in marine science and industry practices.
Many seahorses mate for life, and males are always pregnant. Steven L Gordon/Shutterstock

Nine things you don’t know about seahorses

Fascinating facts about this unusual fish include that it doesn’t swim very well. A marine expert reveals why
Scientists have been consistently documenting environmental changes at research sites like this one in the Cascade Mountains for decades. US Forest Service

Climate change is already disrupting US forests and coasts – here’s what we’re seeing at 5 long-term research sites

This kind of research, with consistent data collection at the same locations over time, helps support global understanding of climate change.
Shutterstock

Marine life is fleeing the equator to cooler waters. History tells us this could trigger a mass extinction event

Climate change has already made tropical oceans too hot for some marine species to survive. As they flee towards the poles, the implications for ecosystems and human livelihoods will be profound.
A sea cucumber living on the Great Barrier Reef inter-reef seafloor. Kent Holmes/Nature Ecology and Evolution

Life on the hidden doughnuts of the Great Barrier Reef is also threatened by climate change

We are only just beginning to understand the importance of this deep and hidden area of the inter-reef that supports a rich diversity of marine life.
Shutterstock

75% of Australia’s marine protected areas are given only ‘partial’ protection. Here’s why that’s a problem

Partially protected areas don’t have more wildlife than unprotected areas. They consume conservation resources and occupy space that could otherwise be allocated to more effective protection.

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