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Artikel-artikel mengenai Australian art

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Hoda Afshar ‘Untitled #88’, from the series ‘Speak the wind’ 2015–22, pigment photographic print, 80 x 100 cm © Hoda Afshar, image courtesy the artist.

How photography can reveal, overlook and manipulate truth: the fearless work of Australian Iranian artist Hoda Afshar

Hoda Afshar is one of Australia’s most significant photo media artists. A Curve is a Broken Line at the Art Gallery of New South Wales is her first major survey exhibition.
Raphaela Rosella with Dayannah Baker Barlow, Kathleen Duncan, Gillianne Laurie, Tammara Macrokanis, Amelia Rosella, Nunjul Townsend, Laurinda Whitton, Tricia Whitton, and family, You’ll Know It When You Feel It, 2011–2023. Installation view, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, 2023. Photo: Louis Lim.

More than a picture: how the work of documentary photographer Raphaela Rosella is defined by co-creation

In You’ll Know It When You Feel It at the Institute of Modern Art, Raphaela Rosella and her co-creators have sought to reclaim and counteract the narratives formed by state records.
Michael Zavros, Australia b.1974, Bad dad 2013. Oil on canvas, 110 x 150cm. Purchased 2016 with funds raised through the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation Appeal. Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art. © Michael Zavros

Nothing is left to chance and every detail is carefully calculated: the hyperrealistic (and divisive) paintings of Michael Zavros

A new exhibition of the Australian artist’s work at QAGOMA is the first comprehensive survey of Michael Zavros in a state gallery.
Winner Archibald Prize 2023, Julia Gutman, Head in the sky, feet on the ground, oil, found textiles and embroidery on canvas, 198 x 213.6 cm © the artist, image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter.

As Julia Gutman’s maverick collage wins the Archibald prize, the award is truly in the hands of a new generation

This year’s Archibald and Wynne Prize winners show that a new generation of artists have now entered the mainstream.
Fred Williams Australia 1927-82, worked in England 1952-56. Elephant 1953 cont é crayon 25.2 x 31.8 cm (sheet) National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Presented by the Art Foundation of Victoria by Mrs Lyn Williams, Founder Benefactor, 1988 © Estate of Fred Williams

Fred Williams is known for his landscapes. But his drawings are little pockets of explosive expressive energy

Studying in London, the young artist examined the human figure, animals in the zoo and the rich cross-section of theatre life and of life on the streets.
Justene Williams, Australia b.1970. The Vertigoats 2021. Mixed media. Installed dimensions variable. Purchased 2021 with funds from the Contemporary Patrons through the QAGOMA Foundation. Collection: QAGOMA. Photograph: Natasha Harth, QAGOMA

QAGOMA’s Embodied Knowledge is an energetic and inclusive celebration of contemporary Queensland art

Embodied Knowledge: Queensland Contemporary Art is a celebration of women, people of colour and LGBTIQA+ artists.
Daniel Boyd, Sir No Beard, 2007. Oil on canvas 183.5 x 121.5 cm. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, gift of Clinton Ng 2012, donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program 378.2012. Image: AGNSW, Felicity Jenkins © Daniel Boyd

How the art of Daniel Boyd turns over the apple cart of accepted white Australian history

Daniel Boyd’s solo exhibition Treasure Island, now at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, is a deeply political and personal interrogation of Australia’s colonial history.
Winner Archibald Prize 2022, Blak Douglas Moby Dickens, synthetic polymer paint on linen, 300 x 200 cm © the artist, image © AGNSW, Mim Stirling

‘I can’t think of a more timely painting’: Blak Douglas’s Moby Dickens is a deserving winner of the 2022 Archibald Prize

This year’s winning Archibald Prize portrait, Moby Dickens by Blak Douglas, encapsulates the justifiable rage felt by people living in flooded Bundjalung country
Ann Newmarch, born Adelaide 1945, died Adelaide 2022, Self-portrait. 1/60th of a second, 1981, Adelaide, photo-etching on paper, 26.4 x 34.7 cm (plate), Public Donations Fund 2015, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, © Ann Newmarch; and Hossein Valamanesh with his work Untitled, Gallery 6, Art Gallery. of South Australia, Adelaide, 2019

Australian art has lost two of its greats. Vale Ann Newmarch and Hossein Valamanesh

Although they work in different genres, a similar sense of restraint imbues the work of each.

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