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American University School of International Service

American University’s School of International Service (SIS) is a top-10 school of international affairs located in Washington, D.C. Since our founding in 1957, we have answered President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s call to prepare students of international affairs to “wage peace.” We do so because we believe the world needs leaders ready to serve.

SIS produces transformational research and prepares more than 3,000 graduate and undergraduate students for global service in government, nonprofits, and business. Our students learn from more than 120 full-time faculty – leading political scientists, economists, sociologists, anthropologists, demographers, geographers, historians, and experts in international development, global health, communications, energy, and the environment – and benefit from an active international network of more than 20,000 alumni. They graduate prepared to combine knowledge and practice and to serve the global community as emerging leaders.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 79 articles

Supporters wave national and military flags in Yangon, Myanmar after the military staged a coup. AP Photo/Thein Zaw

The military coup in Myanmar presents opportunities to Buddhist nationalists

The roots of Buddhist nationalism in Myanmar go back to colonial days. Those behind the military coup are seeking to harness it to legitimize the seizure of power.
Can Joe Biden restore U.S. world leadership? Agela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Biden faces the world: 5 foreign policy experts explain US priorities – and problems – after Trump

Biden wants to restore US global leadership after four years of Trump's isolationism and antagonism. These are some of the challenges and opportunities he'll face, from China to Latin America.
As vice president, Joe Biden – seen here on left, in 2016 – had a working relationship with the Republican Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell. Is that possible now? Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Foreign policy is Biden’s best bet for bipartisan action, experts say – but GOP is unlikely to join him on climate change

A survey of 800 foreign policy experts identified four international issues where Republicans and Democrats may actually cooperate to get something done – and one area of severe disagreement.
Rohingya refugees wait during distribution of food items in 2017 in Bangladesh. AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File

As Bangladesh hosts over a million Rohingya refugees, a scholar explains what motivated the country to open up its borders

A scholar who spent time in refugee camps argues that Bangladesh's culture as well as a painful history of a war in which 10 million sought refuge played a role in the country's opening up of its borders.
On May 27, 1919, British Prime Minister Lloyd George, Italian President Vittorio Orlando, French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau and American President Woodrow Wilson met May 27, 1919, during the Paris Peace Conference. Lee Jackson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

How the failures of the 1919 Versailles Peace Treaty set the stage for today’s anti-racist uprisings

Suffering a pandemic and the aftermath of a war that killed 50 million, the world in 1920 faced a turning point as it negotiated a new political order. As today, the key issue was racial inequality.
Real-time cyberattacks on a display at the 175th Cyberspace Operations Group of the Maryland Air National Guard. U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.

Government cybersecurity commission calls for international cooperation, resilience and retaliation

In the murky world of cyber espionage and cyber warfare, effective deterrence has long been considered out of reach. A government report argues it's time to change that.
Ireland’s health minister, center, models social distancing at his nightly coronavirus press briefing March 27, 2020. Sasko Lazarov/RollingNews.ie/PA Images via Getty Images

Clear, consistent health messaging critical to stemming epidemics and limiting coronavirus deaths

When a government's health messaging during a crisis is inconsistent or unrealistic, it engenders the kind of confusion, misinformation and non-cooperation seen in the US and UK.
In this 2013 photo, Bangladeshi mourners carry the coffin containing the body of blogger Ahmed Rajib Haider for funeral. AP Photo/Pavel Rahman, File

Conservative Islamic views are gaining ground in secular Bangladesh and curbing freedom of expression

In recent years Bangladesh has seen an increase in attacks on religious minorities. A scholar explains how certain extreme views on how Islam is to be followed are taking center stage in the country.
A memorial procession for Sgt. James Johnston, who was killed in Afghanistan in June, passes through Trumansburg, N.Y., Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019. AP/David Goldman

From Vietnam to Afghanistan, all US governments lie

US officials have consistently lied over decades about progress in the Afghanistan war. The lies are no surprise, writes a foreign affairs scholar – but they have profound consequences.
President Donald Trump has rapidly, and without warning to allies or even his own officials, shifted U.S. foreign policy in Syria. AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

Syria military presence risks US credibility with world community

In northern Syria, Trump has caused U.S. allies and rivals to view American commitments in a new, uncertain light. Other countries may now shift to depend less on the U.S., weakening national power.

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