American University School of International Service

American University’s School of International Service (SIS) is a top-10 school of international affairs located in Washington, D.C. Since our founding in 1957, we have answered President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s call to prepare students of international affairs to “wage peace.” We do so because we believe the world needs leaders ready to serve.

SIS produces transformational research and prepares more than 3,000 graduate and undergraduate students for global service in government, nonprofits, and business. Our students learn from more than 120 full-time faculty – leading political scientists, economists, sociologists, anthropologists, demographers, geographers, historians, and experts in international development, global health, communications, energy, and the environment – and benefit from an active international network of more than 20,000 alumni. They graduate prepared to combine knowledge and practice and to serve the global community as emerging leaders.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 70 articles

Real-time cyberattacks on a display at the 175th Cyberspace Operations Group of the Maryland Air National Guard. U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.

Government cybersecurity commission calls for international cooperation, resilience and retaliation

In the murky world of cyber espionage and cyber warfare, effective deterrence has long been considered out of reach. A government report argues it's time to change that.
Ireland’s health minister, center, models social distancing at his nightly coronavirus press briefing March 27, 2020. Sasko Lazarov/RollingNews.ie/PA Images via Getty Images

Clear, consistent health messaging critical to stemming epidemics and limiting coronavirus deaths

When a government's health messaging during a crisis is inconsistent or unrealistic, it engenders the kind of confusion, misinformation and non-cooperation seen in the US and UK.
In this 2013 photo, Bangladeshi mourners carry the coffin containing the body of blogger Ahmed Rajib Haider for funeral. AP Photo/Pavel Rahman, File

Conservative Islamic views are gaining ground in secular Bangladesh and curbing freedom of expression

In recent years Bangladesh has seen an increase in attacks on religious minorities. A scholar explains how certain extreme views on how Islam is to be followed are taking center stage in the country.
A memorial procession for Sgt. James Johnston, who was killed in Afghanistan in June, passes through Trumansburg, N.Y., Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019. AP/David Goldman

From Vietnam to Afghanistan, all US governments lie

US officials have consistently lied over decades about progress in the Afghanistan war. The lies are no surprise, writes a foreign affairs scholar – but they have profound consequences.
President Donald Trump has rapidly, and without warning to allies or even his own officials, shifted U.S. foreign policy in Syria. AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

Syria military presence risks US credibility with world community

In northern Syria, Trump has caused U.S. allies and rivals to view American commitments in a new, uncertain light. Other countries may now shift to depend less on the U.S., weakening national power.
The European Parliament is more fragmented than ever in its history, which could lead to legislative paralysis. Shutterstock

To tackle climate change, immigration and threats to democracy, Europe’s fractious new Parliament will have to work together

Populists didn't do well enough in the EU's recent elections to destroy Europe from within. But with far-right and far-left parties winning new seats, consensus on key issues looks ever less likely.
A board for the Prussian wargame of ‘Kriegsspiel.’ Matthew Kirschenbaum/Wikimedia Commons

War games shed light on real-world strategies

War games let you test your political and military acumen right at your kitchen table – while also helping you appreciate how decision-makers are limited by the choices of others.
Des migrants d'Amérique centrale traversent le Pont international II à Piedras Negras, État de Coahuila, Mexique, à la frontière avec les États-Unis, le 16 février 2019. Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP

Migrants aux portes des États-Unis : pourquoi ils fuient leurs pays

Des milliers de migrants d’Amérique centrale tentent de traverser la frontière sud des États-Unis. Un chercheur a suivi leur chemin pour découvrir les raisons de ce voyage dangereux, parfois mortel.
Benny Gantz, left, leader of the Blue and White party; Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right. REUTERS/Amir Cohen, left; Ariel Schalit/Pool via REUTERS, right

The generals who challenged Netanyahu ran a campaign largely devoid of substance

They wanted to oust Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu in Tuesday's election, but the failure of three centrist generals to talk about key issues may have made Netanyahu the apparent winner.
A man hugs his family before leaving for the U.S. border with a migrant caravan from San Salvador, El Salvador, Jan. 16, 2019. AP/Salvador Melendez

Migrants’ stories: Why they flee

Thousands of Central American migrants are trying to cross the U.S. southern border. One scholar followed their paths to find out why they make the dangerous, sometimes deadly, journey.
Trapping carbon dioxide in minerals happens naturally over thousands of years. Can humans speed it up – safely? Simon Clancy

Can we tweak marine chemistry to help stave off climate change?

Adding industrial chemicals and natural alkaline minerals could slow climate change, but like other geoengineering proposals, it comes with many complex technical and legal challenges.

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