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American University School of International Service

American University’s School of International Service (SIS) is a top-10 school of international affairs located in Washington, D.C. Since our founding in 1957, we have answered President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s call to prepare students of international affairs to “wage peace.” We do so because we believe the world needs leaders ready to serve.

SIS produces transformational research and prepares more than 3,000 graduate and undergraduate students for global service in government, nonprofits, and business. Our students learn from more than 120 full-time faculty – leading political scientists, economists, sociologists, anthropologists, demographers, geographers, historians, and experts in international development, global health, communications, energy, and the environment – and benefit from an active international network of more than 20,000 alumni. They graduate prepared to combine knowledge and practice and to serve the global community as emerging leaders.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 91 articles

International Committee of the Red Cross workers prepare bags with bodies of government soldiers to be handed over in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, in 2015. AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov

Humanitarian aid workers need security, rights and better pay

Nearly all of the 129 aid workers killed on the job in 2021 were from the countries where they lost their lives.
The U.S. has evacuated 84,600 Afghans since August 2021, but many of these people remain in a legal limbo. Master Sgt. Donald R. Allen/U.S. Air Forces Europe-Africa via Getty Images

Afghan evacuees lack a clear path for resettlement in the U.S., 7 months after Taliban takeover

The U.S. has promised to take in 100,000 Ukrainian refugees. But there is concern that this could further complicate efforts to welcome and resettle Afghan evacuees.
Slovenia Prime Minister Janez Jansa (left), Czech Republic Prime Minister Petr Fiala (second from left) and Poland Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki (third from left) meet with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy during a visit to Kyiv on behalf of the European Council on March 16, 2022. Ukrainian Presidency/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Defending Europe: How cultural identity shapes support for Ukraine and armed resistance against Russia

The Russian invasion has triggered an outpouring of support for Ukraine from European countries. Will Putin’s gamble backfire and ultimately push Ukraine firmly into the European fold?
People cross a destroyed bridge as they evacuate the city of Irpin, northwest of Kyiv, during heavy shelling and bombing on March 5, 2022. Aris Messinis / AFP via Getty Images

Ukrainian refugees are welcomed with open arms – not so with people fleeing other war-torn countries

The welcome mat for refugees fleeing war-torn Ukraine stands in stark contrast to recent anti-immigrant policies targeting those from the Middle East, Latin America, Africa and Asia.
Hundreds of Afghan citizens, fleeing their home country, await takeoff after packing inside a U.S. Air Force C-17 transport at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Afghanistan. AP Photo/Capt. Chris Herbert/U.S. Air Force

Where do Afghanistan’s refugees go?

Don’t be misled by the scenes from Kabul airport. Most Afghan refugees don’t leave in an airplane and few will settle in the United States.
On Aug. 16, 2021, thousands of Afghans trapped by the sudden Taliban takeover rushed the Kabul airport tarmac. AP Photo/Shekib Rahmani

Afghanistan only the latest US war to be driven by deceit and delusion

Secretary of State Antony Blinken said that the US Afghanistan pullout is not a repeat of failures in other recent wars. “This is not Saigon,” he said. A seasoned foreign policy expert disagrees.
On the left, fire and smoke rise above buildings in Gaza City as Israeli warplanes target the Palestinian enclave on May 17, 2021; on the right, rockets launched from Gaza flying toward Israel on May 10, 2021. Mahmud Hams / AFP/Getty Images and Mahmoud Issa/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

Both Israel and Hamas are aiming to look strong, instead of finding a way out of their endless war

In most wars, each side’s aggression is meant to get the other side to back down. But that’s not the case with how Israeli and Palestinian leaders have conducted their long-running war.
Supporters wave national and military flags in Yangon, Myanmar after the military staged a coup. AP Photo/Thein Zaw

The military coup in Myanmar presents opportunities to Buddhist nationalists

The roots of Buddhist nationalism in Myanmar go back to colonial days. Those behind the military coup are seeking to harness it to legitimize the seizure of power.
Can Joe Biden restore U.S. world leadership? Agela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Biden faces the world: 5 foreign policy experts explain US priorities – and problems – after Trump

Biden wants to restore US global leadership after four years of Trump’s isolationism and antagonism. These are some of the challenges and opportunities he’ll face, from China to Latin America.
As vice president, Joe Biden – seen here on left, in 2016 – had a working relationship with the Republican Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell. Is that possible now? Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Foreign policy is Biden’s best bet for bipartisan action, experts say – but GOP is unlikely to join him on climate change

A survey of 800 foreign policy experts identified four international issues where Republicans and Democrats may actually cooperate to get something done – and one area of severe disagreement.
Rohingya refugees wait during distribution of food items in 2017 in Bangladesh. AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File

As Bangladesh hosts over a million Rohingya refugees, a scholar explains what motivated the country to open up its borders

A scholar who spent time in refugee camps argues that Bangladesh’s culture as well as a painful history of a war in which 10 million sought refuge played a role in the country’s opening up of its borders.

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