American University School of International Service

American University’s School of International Service (SIS) is a top-10 school of international affairs located in Washington, D.C. Since our founding in 1957, we have answered President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s call to prepare students of international affairs to “wage peace.” We do so because we believe the world needs leaders ready to serve.

SIS produces transformational research and prepares more than 3,000 graduate and undergraduate students for global service in government, nonprofits, and business. Our students learn from more than 120 full-time faculty – leading political scientists, economists, sociologists, anthropologists, demographers, geographers, historians, and experts in international development, global health, communications, energy, and the environment – and benefit from an active international network of more than 20,000 alumni. They graduate prepared to combine knowledge and practice and to serve the global community as emerging leaders.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 60 articles

The European Parliament is more fragmented than ever in its history, which could lead to legislative paralysis. Shutterstock

To tackle climate change, immigration and threats to democracy, Europe’s fractious new Parliament will have to work together

Populists didn't do well enough in the EU's recent elections to destroy Europe from within. But with far-right and far-left parties winning new seats, consensus on key issues looks ever less likely.
A board for the Prussian wargame of ‘Kriegsspiel.’ Matthew Kirschenbaum/Wikimedia Commons

War games shed light on real-world strategies

War games let you test your political and military acumen right at your kitchen table – while also helping you appreciate how decision-makers are limited by the choices of others.
Des migrants d'Amérique centrale traversent le Pont international II à Piedras Negras, État de Coahuila, Mexique, à la frontière avec les États-Unis, le 16 février 2019. Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP

Migrants aux portes des États-Unis : pourquoi ils fuient leurs pays

Des milliers de migrants d’Amérique centrale tentent de traverser la frontière sud des États-Unis. Un chercheur a suivi leur chemin pour découvrir les raisons de ce voyage dangereux, parfois mortel.
Benny Gantz, left, leader of the Blue and White party; Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right. REUTERS/Amir Cohen, left; Ariel Schalit/Pool via REUTERS, right

The generals who challenged Netanyahu ran a campaign largely devoid of substance

They wanted to oust Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu in Tuesday's election, but the failure of three centrist generals to talk about key issues may have made Netanyahu the apparent winner.
A man hugs his family before leaving for the U.S. border with a migrant caravan from San Salvador, El Salvador, Jan. 16, 2019. AP/Salvador Melendez

Migrants’ stories: Why they flee

Thousands of Central American migrants are trying to cross the U.S. southern border. One scholar followed their paths to find out why they make the dangerous, sometimes deadly, journey.
Trapping carbon dioxide in minerals happens naturally over thousands of years. Can humans speed it up – safely? Simon Clancy

Can we tweak marine chemistry to help stave off climate change?

Adding industrial chemicals and natural alkaline minerals could slow climate change, but like other geoengineering proposals, it comes with many complex technical and legal challenges.
The U.S. military is shifting the focus of its cyberwarfare forces. U.S. Air Force

US military steps up cyberwarfare effort

A new strategy for U.S. Cyber Command seeks to block enemies from achieving their objectives – but may not be successful, and could have unforeseen consequences.
Severe malnutrition, like this Yemeni boy experienced, is one of the results of the Yemen conflict. AP/Hani Mohammed

Senate vote could end US complicity in the Saudi-led genocide in Yemen

The US has supported a Saudi-led military coalition that has inflicted profound and deadly damage on Yemen. A Senate vote could end what a human rights scholar says is US complicity in genocide.
Yellow vest protesters want French president Emmanuel Macron to feel their pain. Is he listening? Reuters/Stephane Mahe

Shockwaves from French ‘yellow vest’ protests felt across Europe

President Emmanuel Macron has presented himself as a defender of the liberal order against the rising tide of right-wing populism. But he can't lead Europe while mass protests have France in crisis.
Unlike every president who followed him, George H.W. Bush had a background in foreign policy. In 1972, Bush was serving as U.S. ambassador to the U.N. AP Photo/Dave Pickoff

Why we’ll miss George H.W. Bush, America’s last foreign policy president

The first President Bush had some impressive foreign policies wins, but could he be best remembered for getting the US entangled in Iraq?
Saleh Hassan al-Faqeh holds the hand of his 4-month-old daughter, Hajar, who died at the malnutrition ward of al-Sabeen Hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, Nov. 15, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed al-Sayaghi

US complicity in the Saudi-led genocide in Yemen spans Obama, Trump administrations

The Obama and Trump administrations have supported a military coalition that has inflicted profound and deadly damage on Yemen. A human rights scholar says the US is complicit in genocide.
Screenshot from Republican John Rose’s campaign ad ‘Build the Wall,’ which equates all immigration with the Salvadoran gang MS-13. John Rose For Tennessee via YouTube

Republican ads feature MS-13, hoping fear will motivate voters

MS-13 is not the biggest or most violent gang in the US. But its grisly murders and Latino membership inflame Americans' anxiety about immigration. GOP campaign ads stoke those fears to attack Democrats.
President Vladimir Putin of Russia, Hassan Rouhani of Iran and Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, following their meeting in Tehran, Iran, Sept. 7, 2018. Reuters/Kirill Kudryavtsev/Pool

The US will have to accept second-class status in the Middle East

The US was once the dominant force in the Middle East. That old order has disappeared. Now the new powers are Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Russia – and the US needs a new policy for the region.
Supporters of Nationalist Movement Party at a rally before the June election. REUTERS/Osman Orsal

A turbulent future may be in store for US-Turkish relations

Turkey's close relationship with the US dates back to the Cold War. But after the June election there put nationalists into a position of power in the government, that alliance could turn rocky.

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