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Federal workers based in and near Washington, D.C. raised a total of US$46,639,949.36 in 2015 through the Combined Federal Campaign of National Capital Area. USDA Photo by Shakeitha Stone

What works in workplace giving

By some measures, Americans are giving less to charity through their jobs than they used to. But many companies say that increasing this kind of charity is a priority for them.
What’s the role of faith in service? European Commission DG ECHO

How religion motivates people to give and serve

Religious values, deeply rooted in texts, serve as an important motivator for giving. Religious Americans volunteer more, give more, and give more often.
Americans make charitable donations for many reasons. Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock.com

What influences American giving?

Economic trends, not politics, typically influence how money money Americans donate to charity. Yet some advocacy groups say their donations surged after the 2016 presidential election.
The number of Americans who can get a tax break through their charitable contributions could tumble during the Trump administration. Helen's Photos/www.shutterstock.com

Why Congress should let everyone deduct charitable gifts from their taxes

The tax changes Trump and GOP lawmakers propose would reduce charitable giving, research suggests. But letting everyone use a tax break mostly enjoyed by the rich might prevent that.
Julie Pimentel

Can yoga be Christian?

Wednesday, June 21, is International Yoga Day. A scholar explains how yoga is being Christianized in different parts of the world. So, what then is real yoga?
Tech billionaire Sean Parker and his wife Alexandra Lenas Parker are among today’s youngest and most ambitious donors. Rich Fury/Invision/AP Photo

Should the giving styles of the rich and famous alarm us all?

In 'The Givers,' author David Callahan warns that today's mega-rich philanthropists wield too much political clout. He may be exaggerating their power and lowballing the public's own strength.
Shooters exposed to lead at work over long periods of time, like military personnel in firing ranges, risk a range of medical complaints.

People who shoot risk unhealthy levels of lead exposure

Millions of people who shoot, for work or leisure, risk lead poisoning, according to new research.
A woman holds a flag as she looks out over the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Threats of violent Islamist and far-right extremism: What does the research say?

Data on violent incidents in the US reveal that our focus on Islamist extremism since 9/11 may be misguided.
Sam Sianis, owner of the Billy Goat Tavern in Chicago, on the field prior to a 1984 National League playoff game. AP Photo

The World Series of the Apocalypse?

No team in sports has inspired better literature than the hapless Chicago Cubs. The oeuvre includes a little-known tale by W.P. Kinsella: 'The Last Pennant Before Armageddon.'
The Cannon Street All-Stars watch from the stands at the 1955 Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. 1955 Cannon Street All-Stars/Facebook

How bigotry crushed the dreams of an all-black Little League team

Charleston's Cannon Street YMCA All-Stars thought they'd have a chance to compete for a spot in the coveted Little League World Series. But South Carolina's Little League director had other ideas.
In 2015, gas prices fell below $2 per gallon in Moscow Mills, Missouri. The trend of low gas prices across the United States delay a signature Obama proposal to reduce emissions from cars and trucks. Whitney Curtis/Reuters

Cheap gas could delay America’s efficiency targets for cars and trucks

Faced with stringent fuel economy standards but cheap gas, automakers may seek to delay CAFE rules. What's the best way to reevaluate these emissions-cutting rules?
Joe Louis and Neil Scott help Isaac Woodard up a set a stairs soon after a beating left him blind. Ossie Leviness/New York Daily News

The police beating that opened America’s eyes to Jim Crow’s brutality

Seventy years ago, a horrific beating left a black World War II vet blind. His determined fight for justice would earn the support of Orson Welles, Woody Guthrie – and even the president.
Eye in the sky: the ‘spidercam’ is just one of the technological innovations bringing ever more information to football fans. J. Glover/Wikimedia Commons

Super Bowl 50’s data deluge: How much is too much?

Is there now so much information being shown on football broadcast screens that it's time for another announcerless game?

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