Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University is a world-class university in Baltimore, Maryland. Its goal is to educate its students and cultivate their capacity for life-long learning, to foster independent and original research, and to bring the benefits of discovery to the world.

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Mary E. Harper (left) and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (right), whose two photos in ‘Atlanta Offering’ are unusual. Unidentified Artist, 1895, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, & Rare Book Library, Emory University

The hidden story of two African-American women looking out from the pages of a 19th-century book

A 19th-century volume contained a mystery for two historians who combined their knowledge to tell the story of the women and their contributions to American democracy.
A Syrian archeologist holds an artifact that was transported to Damascus for safe-keeping during the Syrian Civil War. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

We’re just beginning to grasp the toll of the Islamic State’s archaeological looting in Syria

According to a new study, a small portion of a site can yield thousands of objects, adding up to millions of dollars.
A 6-month-old who is infected with measles in Madagascar, March 2019. AP Photo/Laetitia Bezain

Road to measles elimination is predictable, but can be rocky

Scientists identified the general pattern of measles infections as a country moves toward eliminating the disease. This roadmap can help public health workers most efficiently fight and end measles.
Rylie, age 10, is one of the nearly 1000 children diagnosed with Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome, a rare form of autism. Photo curtesy of Pitt Hopkins Research Foundation. Photo credit: Christa Michelle Photography

A drug for autism? Potential treatment for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome offers clues

The complexity of autism makes research difficult, but understanding even rare forms of autism is leading to greater insight into the biology of these disorders and potential new treatments.
Many parents object to vaccination for religious reasons, while others may file for exemptions for convenience. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

A proposal to reduce vaccine exemptions while respecting rights of conscience

Recent measles outbreaks show the dangers of not vaccinating – and the importance of vaccination. Is there a way to accommodate those religiously opposed to vaccination and minimize other exemptions?
A woman casts her ballot at a polling station during a runoff presidential election in Bamako, Mali on Aug. 12, 2018. Reuters/Luc Gnago

Competitive elections are good for democracy – just not every democracy

Elections are supposed to hold politicians accountable: Officials who fear losing their seat will work harder for voters. But in some countries, political competition actually makes government worse.
These rats are in special cages for urine collection. Every year, millions of animals are used for testing chemicals that are used in industrial products. By unoL/shutterstock.com

AI more accurate than animal testing for spotting toxic chemicals

Testing new industrial chemicals is essential for public health and the environment. But animal testing is costly, and too many chemicals are left untested. A new AI tool may solve the problem.
China’s aspirations of global dominance will hit a snag given the world’s other major powers identify democratic values as central to their national identies. Only China and Russia do not. Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing in June 2018. (AP Photo/Dake Kang)

The prospects for Chinese leadership in an age of upheaval

New research suggests the values and identities of the world's great powers present a major barrier to China's aspirations of global domination. Do not bet on China’s hegemonic prospects just yet.
Photo by Kat J on Unsplash

Extreme stress in childhood is toxic to your DNA

Separating children from their parents is not just a psychological stress, it's a DNA stress. Scientific research shows that early life stress may have irreversible effects on how DNA works in the cells of the body.
Former U.S. president Richard Nixon is seen here with Pierre Trudeau in Ottawa in 1972. Nixon was bitterly opposed to Canada’s Auto Pact moves 50 years ago, saying Canada had cheated at the expense of American jobs and investment. He refused calls to exempt Canada from an import surcharge. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Why Canada shouldn’t always count on special treatment from the U.S.

U.S. President Donald Trump has exempted Canada, for now, from hefty tariffs on steel. An increase in defence spending would likely stand Canada in greater stead with the president.

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