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Nigerian Academy of Science

The Nigerian Academy of Science was inaugurated on 8th of January 1977 by an initial group of forty-five Foundation Fellows comprising distinguished scientists in the pure and applied sciences.

The Academy has since grown in membership and diversity into the highest scientific honor society in Nigeria. Since inception, the Academy has operated as a voluntary organization, independent of government control, but collaborating with the government in the growth and development of science and technology in Nigeria.

The Academy is the national member of the following organisations: Inter-Academy Panel (IAP), Inter-Academy Medical Panel (IAMP), the Network of African Science Academies (NASAC), the Inter-Academy Council (IAC), and the International Council for Science (ICSU).

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 24 articles

Mural en la avenida Haile Selassie en Nairobi, Kenia. Boniface Muthoni/SOPA Images/LightRocket vía Getty Images

Triunfos, errores y aprendizajes: expertos africanos reflexionan sobre la respuesta ante la covid-19

A pesar de la pandemia, las disparidades y las estructuras de poder desiguales en la salud mundial siguen intactas. Será difícil afrontar nuevos desafíos globales, como el calentamiento global, si no cambia el sistema.
A mural along Haile Selassie avenue in Nairobi, Kenya. Boniface Muthoni/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Wins, missteps and lessons: African experts reflect on two years of COVID response

It’s a huge cause for concern that, two years into the pandemic, the disparities and unequal power structures in global health are still intact.
The Lagos State government recently approved some private health facilities to administer COVID-19 vaccines in the state. Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How the private sector can boost COVID vaccination in Nigeria

Properly engaged and monitored, Nigeria’s private sector can do more in COVID vaccination exercise.
Nigeria must increase its testing capacity to deal with rising COVID-19 cases Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Nigeria isn’t ready to deal with rising COVID-19 cases

Nigeria must increase its testing capacity and do more genomic studies to deal effectively with the Delta variant of COVID-19.
Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari shows his COVID-19 certificate after receiving his first dose of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine in March 2021. Photo by Kola Sulaimon / AFP via Getty Images

Nigerian academics weigh in on the faults and frustrations of managing COVID-19

Experts assess Nigeria’s response to COVID-19 so far and express worry that the country does not appear to have learnt much; it isn’t prepared for the next pandemic.
Many Nigerians are expected to travel during the Christmas holiday season. Photo by Benson Ibeabuchi/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19: How to reduce risk in the holiday season

In this video interview, Dr Doyin Odubanjo, Executive Secretary of the Nigerian Academy of Science and a public health expert, talks about keeping safe while celebrating Christmas during COVID-19.
The Nigerian government struggles to contain COVID-19 while other diseases suffer some measure of neglect Photo by Kola Sulaimon/AFP via Getty Images

Where COVID-19 has left Nigeria’s health system

Over nine months into COVID-19 outbreak in Nigeria, there are concerns about how well the country has managed the disease pandemic and how this might affect its handling of other diseases.
An aerial view of a new isolation and treatment centre established by the Lagos State government at the main bowl of the state-owned Stadium. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19: to test or not to test

While testing is central to the fight against COVID-19, there are a myriad of factors to consider, especially by African countries, when taking decisions to curtail the spread of the disease.
Alarmed by a rapid spread of Lassa fever, the Nigerian Academy of Science is calling on government to declare a health emergency. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images

Lassa fever: why there’s a call to declare a health emergency in Nigeria

Concerned about rising cases and spread of Lassa fever, the Nigerian Academy of Science has called on government to declare it a national health emergency.
The Monkeypox virus was isolated most recently in 2012 from a dead infant mangabey (species of monkey) in Ivory Coast. Shutterstock

Monkeypox has resurfaced in Nigeria. What you need to know

A disease suspected to be monkeypox is on the rampage in Nigeria. In less than one month, it has spread to seven of the country’s 36 states and infected 31 people.

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