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North Carolina State University

As a land-grant institution, NC State was born as an idea: that higher education should bring economic, societal and intellectual prosperity to the masses. From our origins teaching the agricultural and mechanical arts, we’ve grown to become a pre-eminent research enterprise that advances knowledge in science, technology, engineering, math, design, the humanities and social sciences, textiles and veterinary medicine.

Our students, faculty and staff take problems in hand and work with industry, government and nonprofit partners to solve them. Our 34,000-plus high-performing students apply what they learn in the real world, through research, internships, co-ops and world-changing service. That experiential education ensures they leave here with career-ready skills. And those skills come at a reasonable cost: NC State consistently rates as one of the best values in higher education.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 86 articles

Firefighting foam left after a fire in Pennsylvania. These foams often contain PFAS chemicals that can contaminate water supplies. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

PFAS ‘forever chemicals’ are widespread and threaten human health – here’s a strategy for protecting the public

PFAS chemicals are toxic, widespread and persistent in the environment, and the federal government has been slow to regulate them. A scientist explains why evaluating them one by one isn't working.
Encouraging students at the University of Colorado, Boulder, to vote in the midterm elections, Nov. 6, 2018. Jason Connolly/AFP via Getty Images

Want the youth vote? Some college students are still up for grabs in November

Researchers examined the voting behavior of 5,762 students at 120 colleges and universities. Two groups stood out as an untapped electoral resource – if the candidates can turn out Gen Z.
New research aims to give phone companies tools to help curb robocalls. Peter Dazeley/The Image Bank via Getty Images

Does ignoring robocalls make them stop? Here’s what we learned from getting 1.5 million calls on 66,000 phone lines

The plague of unsolicited automated phone calls isn't abating. By studying robocalls, scholars at the Robocall Observatory are developing ways to help shut them down.
Cylinder seal (left) and modern impression (right) showing two people drinking beer through long straws. Khafajeh, Iraq (Early Dynastic period, c. 2600–2350 B.C.). Courtesy of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago

Brewing Mesopotamian beer brings a sip of this vibrant ancient drinking culture back to life

Beer was extremely popular in ancient Mesopotamia. Sipped through straws, it differed from today’s beer and was enjoyed by people from all walks of life.
The Mississippi state flag, with a representation of the Confederate battle flag, is raised one last time over the state Capitol building on July 1, 2020. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Hit ’em where it hurts – how economic threats are a potent tool for changing people’s minds about the Confederate flag

Public officials and individual citizens alike are more likely to oppose the presence of Confederate symbols when informed it may be bad for local business.
Burning confiscated elephant ivory and animal horns in Myanmar’s first public display of action against the illegal wildlife trade, Oct. 4, 2018. Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images

Can Asia end its uncontrolled consumption of wildlife? Here’s how North America did it a century ago

In the 1800s, Americans hunted many wild species near or into extinction. Then in the early 1900s, the US shifted from uncontrolled consumption of wildlife to conservation. Could Asia follow suit?
In 2018 scientists of the Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control tested a new way to suppress mosquito populations carrying the Zika virus. RHONA WISE/AFP via Getty Images

Genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in Florida and Texas beginning this summer – silver bullet or jumping the gun?

Release of GM mosquitoes in Florida is imminent. But a multidisciplinary team of scientists believe that more studies are needed first. They encourage a publicly accessible registry for GM organisms.
Asteroid Ryugu photographed from a distance of about 12 miles (20 kilometers) looks just gray and bland, but a close-up provides more color. JAXA, University of Tokyo, Kochi University, Rikkyo University, Nagoya University, Chiba Institute of Technology, Meiji University, University of Aizu and AIST

Touching the asteroid Ryugu revealed secrets of its surface and changing orbit

It is a pretty spectacular achievement to not only rendezvous with an asteroid as it is whizzing around the Sun but also collect a sample. Here's what the researchers learned.
Le 15 janvier 2020, dans les environs de Budgong, en Nouvelle-Galles du Sud (Australie). SAEED KHAN/AFP

Après les incendies, le casse-tête de la pollution des eaux

Avec les feux de forêt, la présence massive de cendres et de sédiments dans les cours d’eau constitue une menace pour l’approvisionnement hydrique des populations.

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