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Stellenbosch University

Stellenbosch University (SU) is among South Africa’s leading tertiary institutions based on research output, student pass rates and rated scientists, and is recognised internationally as an academic institution of excellence. This is confirmed by two world university rankings after SU was included in the Times Higher Education and QS (Quacquarelli Symonds) world rankings in 2012, for the second consecutive year. In 2011 the University was also listed on the Leiden rankings, and in 2012 SU was named the leading African University by the Webometrics Ranking of World Universities which ranks universities according to their web presence.

SU also boasts the second-highest number of scientists in South Africa who have been ranked by the National Research Foundation (NRF) – 306 in 2012. With 18 research chairs under the NRF South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARChi), the University is regarded as a leader in the fields of biomedical tuberculosis research and management, wine biotechnology, animal sciences and mathematical biosciences. Another SARChi chair, in the field of invasion biology, is shared between SU and the University of Venda. This constitutes but one of SU’s many partnerships, both local and international. As preferred research partner, SU also participates in various international academic networks.

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Right to die activist Sean Davison (left) speaks to the press after three years of house arrest. Brenton Geach/Gallo Images via Getty Images

The right to die: unpacking an ethical dilemma in South Africa

People make decisions throughout their lives about their health. But when they are terminally ill they are not allowed to decide when they want to die.
Professor Glenda Gray was the most visible female scientist in South African media coverage during the first six months of COVID. South African Medical Research Council

Male voices dominated South African COVID reporting: that has to change

Journalists may unwittingly perpetuate the notion that men are the only experts worth listening to. This limits the visibility of women in science.
Alien trees threaten biodiversity, increase the risk of wildfires and also guzzle water. Photo courtesy Cape Winelands Biosphere Reserve

Removing alien plants can save water: we measured how much

Clearing alien trees from mountain catchments is a more cost-effective approach to providing water than building and maintaining desalination plants.
A soldier salutes during a recent Armed Forces Day parade in South Africa attended by President Cyril Ramaphosa. GCIS/Flickr

South Africa’s military is set for personnel reforms. Why it matters

The declining defence budget has eroded the operating and capital expenditure of the military, leaving insufficient funds for the replacement of equipment, maintenance, and infrastructure.

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