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University of Bergen

With its 17,000 students and more than 2,500 staff, the University of Bergen (Norway) is a medium-sized European university and is both a teaching and research institution organized in seven faculties and some 90 departments and specialised centres. Six faculties cover most of the traditional university disciplines:

Faculty of Humanities

Faculty of Law

Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

Faculty of Psychology

Faculty of Social Sciences

There are also an increasing number of multi-disciplinary research centres, projects and units.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 25 articles

President Donald Trump shakes the hand of EPA chief Scott Pruitt after he announcing the withdrawal of the United States from the Paris climate agreement on June 1, 2017. Pruitt submitted his resignation in July 2018 after a series of scandals. Win McNamee/AFP

Debate: Donald Trump’s war on science and its long-lasting consequences

Conservatives have long tried to attack regulators such as the EPA with “weaponized transparency”. Coupled with the inflation of uncertainty, the intent is to make regulations impossible.
Andrew Simms (New Weather Institute), Sally Svenlen (RE student), Larry Elliott (Guardian), Steve Keen (Debunking Economics) and Kate Raworth (Doughnut Economics) symbolically nail the “33 Theses” to the door of the London School of Economics in December 2017. rethinkeconomics.org

Debate: What is missing in the ‘33 Theses for an Economics Reformation’

Nailed to the door of the London School of Economics, the ‘33 Theses’ offer a long overdue challenge to economics dogma. But there are omissions as well.
French President Emmanuel Macron (right) talks to European Parliament, president Antonio Tajani (left) and Luxembourg’s prime minister, Xavier Bettel (center), during the Gothenburg summit on November 17, 2017. Ludovic Marin/AFP

Gothenburg’s summit for fair jobs and growth: a new narrative for Europe?

The final report of the EU’s summit in Sweden makes generous use of the adjective “fair”. With populism and xenophobia are on the rise, could this be the basis of a new narrative for Europe?
Science itself needs to be put under the microscope and carefully scrutinised to deal with its flaws. Nattapat Jitrungruengnij/Shutterstock

Science’s credibility crisis: why it will get worse before it can get better

We are observing two new phenomena. On one hand doubt is shed on the quality of entire scientific fields or sub-fields. On the other this doubt is played out in the open, in the media and blogosphere.

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