University of Cape Town

Located on the slopes of Devil’s Peak in Cape Town, the University of Cape Town is a leading, research-intensive university in South Africa and on the continent, known for its academic excellence and pioneering scholarship. The university is home to a third of South Africa’s A-rated researchers (acknowledged by the Department of Science and Technology as international leaders in their field) and a fifth of the country’s national research chairs. UCT encourages students and staff to use their expertise to speed up social change and economic development across the country and continent, while pursuing the highest standards of excellence in academic knowledge and research: developing African solutions to African challenges that are also shared by developing nations around the world.

UCT, like the city of Cape Town, has a vibrant, cosmopolitan community drawn from all corners of South Africa. It also attracts students and staff from more than 100 countries in Africa and the rest of the world. The university has strong partnerships and networks with leading African and other international institutions - helping to enrich the academic, social and cultural diversity of the campus as well as to extend the reach of UCT’s academic work.

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A fire rages through wetlands close to Cape Town in February 2017. EPA/Nic Bothma

What science tells us about fire hazards facing Cape Town and its surrounds

The danger of fires in the Cape region this season is partly dependent on how the Fynbos has been managed over the past few decades.
Khayelitsha in Cape Town, South Africa. The country can’t afford to be distracted from problems of poverty, inequality and joblessness. EPA/Nic Bothma

South Africa must harness technology in a way that helps fix its problems

The ideas about the Fourth Industrial Revolution being punted by the World Economic Forum will fail to contribute to economic growth and job creation, and will amplify existing inequalities.
Each of South Africa’s former presidents treated the state broadcaster very differently. From left Jacob Zuma, Nelson Mandela, and Thabo Mbeki (2008). Epa/Kim Ludbrook

Why South Africa needs to fix its troubled public broadcaster

The South African Broadcasting Corporation, like South Africa itself, is a symbol of contradictions. While there are bad people who work for it, there are also many good ones.
The view of our planet from aboard the International Space Station. Expedition 43/NASA

Curious Kids: What is the Earth made of?

Of all the planets in the solar system, there’s a reason we call Earth home. It’s made of just the right stuff. It’s not too small, or too big, or too hot or too cold. It’s just right.
Moody’s, the only rating agency that keeps South Africa above junk, is scheduled to review its credit rating in November 2019. Shutterstock

South Africa is close to ‘junk status’ from all three rating agencies. What could follow?

How South African manages the fallout from its likely downgrade by Moody's in November will determine whether the country will be forced to turn to the IMF for a bailout.
Ambiguity of the transformation rules made it possible for mining companies to renege on their commitments. Shutterstock

Disconnect between business and state contributed to Marikana massacre

A lesson from the 2012 massacre of mineworkers is the need for government to retain its role as primary governance agent, enforcing clear rules and ensuring the provision of public goods and services.
In the near future, the ability to code will be as essential as knowing how to read, write and count. Shutterstock

Coding in South African schools: what needs to happen to make it work

South Africa's introducing coding as a school subject but until teacher education, IT infrastructure and internet connectivity issues, among others are addressed, the country has a long way to go.

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