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University of Colorado Boulder

At the foot of the Rocky Mountains, the University of Colorado Boulder is nationally recognized as one of only 36 AAU public research universities. Established in 1876, CU Boulder is a Tier 1 public research university with five Nobel laureates, nine MacArthur “genius” fellows and is the No. 1 public university recipient of NASA awards. CU Boulder is a leader in many fields, including aerospace engineering, physics and environmental law. The school partners with many notable federal research labs, including the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). CU Boulder students thrive academically and athletically, with Buff athletes competing in the NCAA Division I Pac-12 conference.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 279 articles

ExxonMobil has been granted nearly $580 million in tax abatements in Louisiana since 2000. Barry Lewis/Getty Images

Louisiana governor makes it easier for companies to receive lucrative tax breaks that take money away from cash-strapped schools

Louisiana’s governor made it easier for companies to receive property tax breaks – and schools will likely pay the price.
Alguns jovens passam muitas horas por dia nas mídias sociais. ViewApart/iStock via Getty Images Plus

‘Está sequestrando meu cérebro’ - uma equipe de especialistas encontrou maneiras de ajudar os jovens viciados em mídias sociais a reduzir o desejo

Medidas práticas para reduzir a dependência: desativar as notificações, remover ou limitar os aplicativos que você considera prejudiciais, controlar seu feed de mídia social deixando de seguir determinadas contas e reservar um tempo livre do telefone
Exxon Mobil Corp.’s campus in East Baton Rouge Parish, left, received millions in tax abatements to the detriment of local schools, right.

How tax breaks strangle American schools − billions of dollars that could help students vanish from budgets, especially hurting districts that serve poor students

An estimated 95% of US cities provide economic development tax incentives to woo corporate investors, taking billions away from schools.
America’s biggest book publishers originally viewed LGBTQ+ romance as a niche market. Klaus Vedfelt/DigitalVision via Getty Images

What’s behind the astonishing rise in LGBTQ+ romance literature?

It’s tempting to see this trend as a sign of the times. But the biggest book publishers started changing their approach only once they realized they were leaving money on the table.
Exxon Mobil Corp.’s campus in East Baton Rouge Parish, left, received millions in tax abatements to the detriment of local schools, right. Barry Lewis/Getty Images, Tjean314/Wikimedia

Students lose out as cities and states give billions in property tax breaks to businesses − draining school budgets and especially hurting the poorest students

An estimated 95% of US cities provide economic development tax incentives to woo corporate investors, taking billions away from schools.
Lawyers write too much. That’s why the Supreme Court and other U.S. courts impose word limits on them. siraanamwong/ iStock / Getty Images Plus

Supreme Court word-count limits for lawyers, explained in 1,026 words

Lawyers submitting briefs to the Supreme Court in the Trump Colorado ballot case must file a ‘certificate of word count.’ Why? As one judge put it, lawyers’ briefs are ‘too long, too long, too long.’
Plus de trois fois sur quatre, c’est la complémentarité entre la tête d’affiche de l’équipe et le reste des membres qui apporte le plus de valeur aux recherches. Flickr/NTNU

Qui mène les découvertes scientifiques : de grandes personnalités ou de grandes équipes ?

Une étude montre qu’un juste équilibre doit être trouvé entre les prouesses individuelles et l’effort collectif.
Two pundits – Jonah Goldberg, left, and Paul Begala, second from right – discuss politics with journalists Kristen Holmes and Jake Tapper. The Conversation

Pundits: Central to democracy, or partisan spewers of opinion who destroy trust

Pundits are everywhere, giving their analyses of current events, politics and the state of the world. You’ll hear a lot more from them this election year. Is their rank opinion good for democracy?
AI has arrived. How will it change society in the year ahead? Pavel_Chag/iStock via Getty Images

AI is here – and everywhere: 3 AI researchers look to the challenges ahead in 2024

Artificial intelligence is everywhere, and the tech industry is racing along to develop ever more powerful AIs. Three scholars look ahead to the next chapter in this technological revolution.
Giovanna Stevens grew up harvesting salmon at her family’s fish camp on Alaska’s Yukon River. Climate change is interrupting hunting and fishing traditions in many areas. AP Photo/Nathan Howard

Arctic Report Card 2023: From wildfires to melting sea ice, the warmest summer on record had cascading impacts across the Arctic

The early heat melted snow and warmed rivers, heating up the land and downstream ocean areas. The effects harmed salmon fisheries, melted sea ice and fueled widespread fires.
Candles on a large Hanukkah menorah shine in front of a Christmas tree at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany, in 2015. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

Hanukkah celebrations have changed dramatically − but the same is true of Christmas

Assimilation no doubt played a role in making Hanukkah the commercialized holiday it is today. But other factors shaped the modern festival, too, a scholar of Jewish studies and gender explains.
The stark landscape of the Moon as viewed by the Apollo 12 astronauts on their return to Earth. NASA / The Planetary Society

Scientists suspect there’s ice hiding on the Moon, and a host of missions from the US and beyond are searching for it

Some dark craters on the Moon are never exposed to light − ice could be hiding in these permanently shadowed regions, and India’s Chandrayaan-3 mission marked a big step toward finding it.

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