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A private research university with more than 15,000 students from around the world, the University of Miami is a vibrant and diverse academic community focused on teaching and learning, the discovery of new knowledge, and service to the South Florida region and beyond.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 40 articles

A lab worker extracts DNA from samples for further tests at the AIDS Vaccine Design and Development Laboratory Dec. 1, 2008 in New York City. Chris Hondros/Getty Images

HIV/AIDS vaccine: Why don’t we have one after 37 years, when we have several for COVID-19 after a few months?

Scientists developed vaccines for COVID-19 in a matter of months. Why after 37 years do we still not have one for HIV/AIDS? On HIV Vaccine Awareness Day, it's an important question to ask.
Parents may find it challenging to get their children comfortable going back out into the world. Paul Bersebach/Orange County Register via Getty Images

America goes back to school – 5 essential reads on parenting in the pandemic

As more people get vaccinated and different facets of society slowly reopen, challenges remain in the nation's quest to get back to normal. Here are five articles that help illuminate the path.
Tampa Bay’s sea grass meadows need sunlight to thrive. Algae blooms block that light and can be toxic to marine life. Joe Whalen Caulerpa/Tampa Bay Estuary Program via Unsplash

Water being pumped into Tampa Bay could cause a massive algae bloom, putting fragile manatee and fish habitats at risk

Harmful algae blooms are an increasing problem in Florida. Once nutrients are in the water to fuel them, little can be done to stop the growth, and the results can be devastating for marine life.
Whether just comfortable at home or nervous about leaving, kids may need extra support to get back out there. Imgorthand/E+ via Getty Images

Here’s how to help your kids break out of their pandemic bubble and transition back to being with others

After more than a year of isolation and empty schedules, some kids might be apprehensive or anxious about interacting with the outside world. Psychology experts provide tips to ease the transition.
‘What happened to Joe Biden?’ A 2020 Trump campaign attack advert. Donald J Trump/YouTube

How political attack adverts can backfire

Negative political advertising can actually spark more curiosity about a policy issue.
Masks are a crucial tool for stopping the pandemic – but don’t let them give you a false sense of security. Patricia J. Garcinuno/Getty Images Entertainment via Getty Images Europe

Mandatory face masks might lull people into taking more coronavirus risks

Policies meant to improve public health – like mandatory face masks during the coronavirus pandemic – need to take into account how people might adjust other behaviors in response.
Les mesures de protection et leurs garanties de sécurité peuvent changer la façon dont les gens agissent face aux risques. Alfredo Falcone/LaPresse via AP

Coronavirus : quand les mesures de sécurité conduisent à un comportement plus risqué

L'utilisation généralisée de masques faciaux, de désinfectants pour les mains et d'autres mesures préventives pourrait contre-intuitivement encourager des comportements plus risqués.
Protective measures and their safety assurances can change how people act around risk. Alfredo Falcone/LaPresse via AP

When safety measures lead to riskier behavior by more people

Behavioral economists explain how widespread use of face masks, hand sanitizer and other preventive measures could counterintuitively encourage riskier behaviors around coronavirus.
Did ancient Egyptian parents worry their kids might get addicted to this game, called senet? Keith Schengili-Roberts/Wikimedia Commons

Games blamed for moral decline and addiction throughout history

Somewhere between the early Buddhist times and today, worries about game addiction have given way to scientific understanding of the benefits of play, rather than its detriments.
Black tip sharks swim with tropical fish in a lagoon in French Polynesia. (Shutterstock)

Killing sharks, wolves and other top predators won’t solve conflicts

When humans have conflicts with wildlife, the first reaction is often to cull them. But there's little evidence to show that it works, and removing predators can even backfire and make things worse.
Scène de violence domestique jouée au théâtre en pleine rue, à Chandigarh, en Inde, 2016. Biswarup Ganguly/Wikimedia

#YouToo : quand le prédateur est votre conjoint

À l’occasion de la Journée internationale des femmes et au-delà du mouvement #MeToo, il est crucial de rappeler qu’une majeure partie des violences faites aux femmes sont causées par leurs conjoints.

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