University of Michigan

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading research universities. The hallmark of the university is the breadth of excellence across its 19 schools and colleges and the exceptional degree of interdisciplinary cooperation among them.

With more than a billion dollars in research expenditures annually, and 100 graduate and professional programs ranked in the top ten in the latest U.S. News & World Report rankings, U-M is a global leader in science and technology; health, law and public policy; the arts and humanities; and a wide range of other academic disciplines.

More than 61,000 students on three University of Michigan campuses (Ann Arbor, Dearborn and Flint) come from every state and 129 countries. And with more than 540,000 living degree holders, U-M has one of the nation’s largest alumni bodies.

Discover more on the U-M website: www.umich.edu

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 273 articles

More women than men avoid sex, but the reasons for both genders vary. PKPix/www.shutterstock.com

Who’s avoiding sex, and why

Sex is an important part of life, but many people avoid it. Fear, former abuse and religion are common reasons, but you may be surprised to know how your overall health also leads to avoidance.
Health care personnel in all hospitals work hard to provide first-rate care, but academic hospitals carry an added responsibility. Some have questioned whether that dilutes clinical care. gpointstudios/Shutterstock.com

As academic hospitals lower mortality rates, should insurers reconsider excluding them?

Many academic medical centers are facing increasing financial pressure as insurers create so-called narrow networks, but a recent study of mortality data may lead insurers to reconsider.
After two terror attacks the prior week, police patrolled the Westminster Bridge on election day 2017 in London. AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Lessons for first responders on the front lines of terrorism

Given the persistent risk of terrorist attacks and large-scale accidents, it's more critical than ever for EMTs, police, firefighters and others to learn from the past.
Krasinski Square in Warsaw, Poland just before Trump’s speech. Reuters/Kacper Pempel

Is Trump actually popular in Poland?

A historian who studies Poland witnesses the president’s visit to Warsaw, and casts a skeptical eye at the crowd that took in the president’s speech.
A homeless camp in Los Angeles, where homelessness has risen 23 percent in the past year, in May 2017. AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Why poverty is not a personal choice, but a reflection of society

Americans, an independent group, tend to believe that people can "pull themselves up by their boot straps." Yet bigger forces are at play in a person's ability to gain education, a good job and money.
The sun rises behind the remains of a New Jersey roller coaster destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. AP Photo/Mel Evans

New data set explores 90 years of natural disasters in the US

As the rich move away from disaster-prone areas, the poor may be left behind.
The surge in U.S. oil and natural gas production has transformed the energy picture in the country, but the influence is muted globally. Pixabay

Is energy ‘dominance’ the right goal for US policy?

The Trump administration has set a new national policy: energy dominance. But can the US really dominate other countries through fossil fuel exports?
SNAP helps millions of Americans get food on their tables. Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

The Trump team’s poor arguments for slashing SNAP

Cutting the program formerly known as food stamps would hurt low-income Americans and the whole economy. As research indicates that it's working well, this drive to defund is baffling experts.
White men gain more health benefits from employment than do black men and women. Angela Waye/from www.shutterstock.com

Employment helps white men’s health more than women and blacks

Employment is good for health, but it is even better for white men than for others. And unemployment is worse for white men than others. Could these findings shine light on our political situation?
A student takes a nap on a desk during his lunch break studying for the National College Entrance Exam in Anhui Province, China. June 2, 2012. Reuters/Jianan Yu

Matchmaker, matchmaker, find me a school: College admissions in China

Every year, 9 million students in China compete for just 6 million college admission spots. The systems that match students with schools are being overhauled. But will that improve outcomes?
Some minorities are less likely to think that their college dreams could become a reality. AP Photo/Tim Boyd

Can people ‘like me’ go to college? Inequality and dreams of higher ed

While most Americans do aspire to higher education, college is not a reality for many. But why is the gap between hopes and reality larger for some? And how can we strive for equity?

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