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Virginia Tech takes a hands-on, engaging approach to education, preparing scholars to be leaders in their fields and communities. As the commonwealth’s most comprehensive university and its leading research institution, Virginia Tech offers 215 undergraduate and graduate degree programs to more than 30,000 students and manages a research portfolio of more than $450 million. The university fulfills its land-grant mission of transforming knowledge to practice through technological leadership and by fueling economic growth and job creation locally, regionally, and across Virginia.

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An Argentine justice crusader who calls himself Menganno has been patrolling the streets of the city of Lanus since 2010. Netflix has now picked up his character. Netflix Latinoamérica (screenshot)

How Latin America’s protest superheroes fight injustice and climate change – and sometimes crime, too

In Latin America, common citizens have often donned outlandish outfits and comic book-inspired personas to lead demonstrations and promote social change.
A November 2020 memorial in Washington, D.C. consisted of thousands of flags, each planted to remember someone who died of COVID-19. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

578,555 people have died from COVID-19 in the US, or maybe it’s 912,345 – here’s why it’s hard to count

Record-keepers have a pretty good sense of how many people have died. But figuring out the cause of those deaths is a lot trickier – and that’s why reasonable modelers can disagree.
A girl views the body of her father, who died of COVID-19, while mourners who can’t visit in person are onscreen. Joe Raedle/Getty Images News via Getty Images

279,700 extra deaths in the US so far in this pandemic year

Health statisticians keep careful tabs on how many people die every week. Based on what’s happened in past years, they know what to expect – but 2020 death counts are surging beyond predictions.
The number of confirmed and probable deaths from COVID-19 in New York City was 23,247 as of July 10, which is more than eight times the number who died in the 9/11 attack. Angela Weiss / AFP via Getty Images

How deadly is COVID-19? A biostatistician explores the question

The COVID-19 death toll in the US is now over 130,000. What do 130,000 fatalities look like? A biostatistician provides some perspective.
Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign logo inspired scholars to study the role of typeface in political communication. Getty/Sebastian Willnow/DDP/AFP

Typefaces have personality – and can be political

Everything is political. And that includes typefaces, write two scholars who found that people see one group of typeface styles as liberal, another group of styles as conservative.
Discolored water can be caused by heavy metals, such as iron or copper. Iron can also act as a nutrient for organisms to grow in the pipes. Kyungyeon Ra/Purdue University

The coronavirus pandemic might make buildings sick, too

Office buildings have been left mostly empty for weeks amid the coronavirus pandemic, leaving standing water in pipes where harmful organisms can grow. What happens when those buildings reopen?
Santé Canada impose des normes parmi les plus restrictives au monde sur le plomb, mais elles sont inefficaces sans procédures de tests et un programme de remplacement des canalisations. Shutterstock

Eau contaminée au plomb : comment s’assurer que nos maisons, nos écoles et nos lieux de travail soient sécuritaires

Une enquête a montré que les niveaux de plomb dans l’eau de cinq villes canadiennes étaient comparables à ceux de Flint, au Michigan, au pire du scandale de l'eau contaminée.
Health Canada has some of the strongest limits on lead in the world, but they can’t be effective without testing and a plan to replace pipes. (Shutterstock)

Lead-tainted water: How to keep homes, schools, daycares and workplaces safe

An investigation showed that five Canadian cities had lead levels in their water on par with those in Flint, Mich. during its peak period of water contamination.
Pfc Elias Friedensohn in June 1945 at the Special Services Distributing Point, Seine Section, Paris, France. National Archives

The American GI in WWII, uncensored

An unprecedented survey of US GIs that began in 1941, preserved on microfilm, provides a raw and uncensored story of average Americans grappling with both national ideals and practical necessities.

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