Professor of Law, University of Tasmania

I started my academic career as a scientist, receiving a BSc with first class honours in zoology from Manchester University, an MSc with distinction and a PhD from Dalhousie University in Canada. My scientific research was in the area of cell biology, with particular focus on the development of simple nervous systems.

In 1992, I commenced studying law at the University of Tasmania and obtained a first class honours degree in 1996. I subsequently completed my LLM thesis in 1997 on Patenting of Human Genetic Material in Australia.

I was admitted as a barrister and solicitor to the Supreme Court of Tasmania and the High Court in 1998. I practised law for at Dobson Mitchell and Allport in Hobart, mostly in the areas of personal injury law and intellectual property law until 2000, when I was appointed as Lecturer at the University of Tasmania. I now hold the position of Professor. I am the Chair of Academic Senate at the University of Tasmania and have a number of administrative roles.

My research focuses on the legal issues associated with the commercialisation of genetic knowledge and patenting of genetic inventions.

Experience

  • 2000–present
    Law academic, University of Tasmania

Education

  • 1997 
    University of Tasmania, LLM
  • 1987 
    Dalhousie University, Canada, PhD (Biology)

Research Areas

  • Intellectual Property Law (180115)