University of Tasmania

Established in 1890, the University of Tasmania is the fourth oldest university in Australia. UTAS is committed to the creation, preservation, communication and application of knowledge, as well as excellence in all teaching, research and scholarly activities.

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Australia got in first with restrictions on foreign investors in housing, but Jacinda Arden’s new government plans to go further. Daniel Munoz/AAP

Foreign ownership of housing – how do Australia and New Zealand compare?

Concerns about foreign investors driving up housing prices have been growing. Australia was first to bar foreign purchases of existing residential property, but New Zealand is set to go further.
Heaven only knows what sort of excursion Wooredy and Truganini thought they had embarked upon on when G.A. Robinson took them to Recherche Bay in 1830 to make an overland trek to the Tasmanian west coast. Cassandra Pybus

Friday essay: journey through the apocalypse

Wooredy and his second wife Truganini set off into the Tasmanian wilderness with settler George Robinson in 1830, on a "conciliatory" mission to find other original Tasmanians. Their stories bear witness to a psychological and cultural transition without parallel in modern colonialism.
Immediate cash incentives have been shown to be more effective in helping people quit, and cost us less in the long-run. Sajjad Zabihi/Unsplash

Why we should pay people to stop smoking

Studies have found paying people to quit is more effective than other methods, so why are we not considering it in Australia?
Clouds over Australia’s Davis Research Station, containing ice particles that activate ozone-depleting chemicals, triggering the annual ozone hole. Barry Becker/BOM/AAD

After 30 years of the Montreal Protocol, the ozone layer is gradually healing

The treaty to limit the destruction of the ozone layer is hailed as the most successful environmental agreement of all time. Three decades on, the ozone layer is slowly but surely returning to health.
Melting Antarctic ice can trigger effects on the other side of the globe. NASA/Jane Peterson

How Antarctic ice melt can be a tipping point for the whole planet’s climate

The climate secrets contained in an ancient tree that lived through abrupt global change reveal how Antarctica can trigger rapid warming in the north by dumping cold water into the Southern Ocean.

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