Assistant Professor of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut

I am broadly interested in studying how fish populations are adapted to the natural variability in their environment and how they may therefore react to unfolding anthropogenic changes in our oceans and coastal waters. This includes changes in pH (ocean acidification) and temperature (global warming), but also ubiquitous man-made alterations to the marine food web and natural mortality patterns (fisheries exploitation and selection). I pursue these questions by employing a healthy mix of experimental, field, and modeling approaches with tools ranging widely from otolith microstructure and microchemistry, fish physiology, to population dynamics and evolutionary genetics. Specifically, our current two foci are: (i) understanding local and regional adaptation and vulnerability in coastal fish to co-occurring acidification and hypoxia, and (2) reconstructing a decade-scale historical growth distribution of commercial species (e.g. Georges Bank haddock) to investigate changes due to climate and fishing pressure.

Experience

  • –present
    Assistant Professor of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut