Reader in Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL

I have a PhD in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Southern California but found I was more interested in natural intelligence. As a result, I moved into the field of cognitive neuroscience studying how the human brain uses and comprehends language. Although many animals communicate, sometimes in sophisticated ways, no other species uses the structured system of communication we call language. The main aim of my research is to investigate what has changed in human brains that allow us to chat, read, gossip, and browse the web when our primate cousins cannot. To do this, I use a set of non-invasive tools to measure brain anatomy and function in healthy, normal volunteers and compare our results with those from animal studies. I am currently the Head of the Experimental Psychology department at UCL.

Recently I've also become interested in consumer neuroscience: how can neuroscience can be used to inform marketing and better understand consumer behaviour? I work with executives to help separate the facts from the hype and provide practical training on the latest techniques including expert analysis of the technology, resource, and cost requirements of conducting effective neuromarketing research. My aim is to equip anyone wanting to understand the very latest developments in consumer neuroscience with knowledge about the opportunities neuroscience can offer marketing, as well making them aware of its limitations.

Experience

  • –present
    Reader in Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL

Education

  • 1998 
    USC, PhD in Computer Science