Keith Thor Carlson

Professor of History, Research Chair in Indigenous & Community-engaged History, University of Saskatchewan

Keith Thor Carlson is Professor of History at the University of Saskatchewan where he holds the Research Chair in Indigenous and Community-Engaged History. Prior to coming to the UofS he worked for a decade as historian for the Stó:lō Nation in British Columbia. There he collaborated with Knowledge Keepers to research the history and historical consciousness of Indigenous people and examine the history of settler colonialism. His research into the 1886 murder of a Stó:lō youth by an American lynch mob led to the documentary film The Lynching of Louie Sam (2004), and this in turn motivated the Washington State legislature to issues a formal apology to the Stó:lō community.

Prof. Carlson has authored six books, including the award winning The Power of Place, The Problem of Time: Aboriginal Collective Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism (2010), and edited or co-edited four additional books including The Stó:lō-Coast Salish Historical Atlas (2001) and Orality and Literacy: Reflections Across Disciplines (2011). With John Lutz (UVic) and colleagues at the Stó:lō Nation, Carlson offers the only graduate-level humanities-based Ethnohistory Fieldschool in North America. Recently he launched the Community-engaged History Collaboratorium where he facilitates partnerships with Indigenous, cultural, and heritage organizations to provide paid summer research internships to undergraduate students.

Experience

  • –present
    Professor of History, Research Chair in Indigenous & Community-engaged History, University of Saskatchewan