Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Flinders University

My research is focused on sleep, circadian rhythms (also known as our ‘body clock’), and insomnia. It is well known that poor, or disrupted, sleep is associated with a host of adverse effects including sleepiness, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and increased accidents on the road and in the workplace. For an individual who is suffering from sleeping difficulties, these consequences have a significant impact on their physical and psychological health, relationships with family and friends, and ultimately their overall quality of life. My research is aimed at exploring and understanding the relationship between sleep, daytime functioning and mood.

A large part of my research is aimed evaluating and improving different treatment strategies to minimise the adverse effects of poor sleep. Some of these strategies include cognitive-behaviour therapy, bright light therapy, melatonin, napping, and the use of school-based sleep education programs.

The findings of my research have important implications not only for improving the effectiveness of therapies used to treat sleep disorders, but also for enhancing the health, safety and welfare of a range of groups including adolescents, shift workers, individuals suffering from sleep disorders, and older adults.

Experience

  • 2012–present
    Post Doctoral Research Fellow, School of Psychology, Flinders University
  • 2015–present
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Flinders University

Education

  • 2012 
    Flinders University, PhD

Honours

PhD