Flinders University

Since its establishment in 1966, Flinders University has enjoyed a well-justified reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It has a long-standing commitment to enhancing educational opportunities for all and a proud record of community engagement.

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When does parody spill into insensitive cultural appropriation? While Chris LIlley is probably OK to appropriate the upper North Shore culture of Ja’mie (pictured), he’s on dodgier ground with Jonah from Tonga. Princess Pictures, Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), Home Box Office (HBO)

Permission to laugh? Humour without risk of danger and offence would be an emaciated thing

In our pursuit of a world that is safely and entirely OK, must humour be cleansed of its original sin of cultural appropriation and insensitivity? It depends whether we are 'laughing up' or 'laughing down'.
Sabbia Gallery - Alison Milyika Carroll working on a pot at Ernabella Arts ceramic studio, 2017. Photo Ernabella Arts, Courtesy of Sabbia Gallery

All fired up: Clay Stories is a triumphant display of contemporary Indigenous ceramics

Clay Stories, a travelling exhibition, showcases ceramic art from Indigenous artists across the country. It is a triumphant display of specific stories and Dreamings, standing against cultural and political amnesia.
Pasta and bolognese sauce were on the menu provided at this Sydney venue by not-for-profit organisation Foodbank.

‘Successful failures’ – the problem with food banks

Foodbanks were originally established as a temporary measure to alleviate food insecurity. But have they become an excuse for governments not to deal properly with the problem?
Indigenous Australians use ochre to add colour and detail to items such as this shield at the South Australian Museum. Image courtesy of South Australian Museum

When bacteria tell a story: tracing Indigenous Australian ochre sources via microbial ‘fingerprinting’

Ochre is more than just paint - it tells stories of culture and trade in Indigenous Australians. Using museum artefacts plus science can track ochre sources and untangle a lost history.
Without satellites, modern technologies such mobiles phones and GPS would not exist. Flickr/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Curious Kids: How do satellites get back to Earth?

We've all seen videos of satellites being blasted off into space - but once they're locked in orbit around the earth, how do we bring them back down?
Peter Cummins as Monk O’Neill in the 1972 Australian Performing Group production of A Stretch of the Imagination. Photographer unknown.

The Great Australian Plays: Williamson, Hibberd and the better angels of our country’s nature

David Williamson and Jack Hibberd tower over Australian drama. Williamson's The Department and Hibberd's A Stretch of the Imagination both showcase the strange yet compelling detachment of these playwrights' visions.
The Telstar 1 satellite inspired a chart-topping pop tune, the iconic black-and-white hexagonal Adidas soccer ball, and maybe even a Doctor Who creature, the Mecanoids. National Physical Laboratory

Trash or treasure? A lot of space debris is junk, but some is precious heritage

Protecting culturally significant spacecraft enables people on Earth to feel connected to space as the common heritage of humanity.
Can the left bounce back? The UK Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn, French Socialist Party’s Benoit Hamon and German socialist party leader Martin Schulz certainly hope so, as does New Zealand Labour’s great hope, Jacinda Ardern. Reuters, Ulysse Bellier/Flickr, Shutterstock

The year of living ineffectually: 2017 proves shaky for the centre-left

The centre-left has had a torrid year, particularly in Europe, but there are glimmers of hope on the horizon and hope for it to regroup.
The creative arts are not a lifestyle choice. They are a life. Dan Himbrechts/AAP

University cuts – the dire implications for the creative arts

The plan is there is no plan. On climate change, immigration, energy, marriage equality – pick an area – the federal government displays policy desuetude and political exhaustion. Around the world, the…
Strongyloides can affect anyone but is most prevalent in areas of economic disadvantage. LUCY HUGHES JONES/AAP

Strongyloidiasis is a deadly worm infecting many Australians, yet hardly anybody has heard of it

Up to 60% of people in some Indigenous Australian communities are infected with a parasitic worm that almost nobody has heard of, and without treatment, the infection can be fatal.
Unless we design research programs to look at why people would rather stay on country than receive effective health treatments, Aboriginal health may not improve. Dan Peled/AAP

Controlled experiments won’t tell us which Indigenous health programs are working

Like all good health care, improving health in remote settings requires an evidence base. But forcing all research questions into the randomised controlled trial model is not the answer.

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