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Flinders University

With a vision to be internationally recognised as a world leader in research, an innovator in contemporary education, and the source of Australia’s most enterprising graduates, Flinders University aspires to create a culture that supports students and staff to succeed, to foster research excellence that builds better communities, to inspire education that produces original thinkers, and to promote meaningful engagement that enhances our environment, economy and society. Established in 1966, Flinders now caters to more than 26,000 students and respectfully operates on the lands of 17 Aboriginal nations, with a footprint stretching from Adelaide and regional South Australia through Central Australia to the Top End.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 838 articles

The bodies of comb jellies like Mertensia ovum are soft, meaning they rarely fossilize. (Alexander Semenov)

Finding a rare fossilized comb jelly reveals new gaps in the fossil record

Fossilized comb jellies, or ctenophores, are rare because the creatures are almost completely soft-bodied. Rare fossil finds are helping us learn more about ancient animals and evolution.
Steven Benjamin/Not for reuse

South Africa’s massive ‘sardine run’ leads fish into an ecological trap

Sardines from the cold waters off South Africa’s Atlantic coast are attracted to cold water upwelling in the Indian Ocean. When the upwelling ends, they are trapped in water that is too warm for them.
Bruce Lander, then-Independent Commissioner Against Corruption (ICAC), appears before a SA parliamentary committee in 2018. Kelly Barnes/AAP

As a NSW premier falls and SA guts its anti-corruption commission, what are the lessons for integrity bodies in Australia?

South Australia has shown other Australian jurisdictions what not to do with their anti-corruption bodies, especially the proposed federal integrity commission.
People who fled the war in Tigray gather around in a temporarily built internally displaced people. Amanuel Sileshi/AFP via Getty Images

How conflict has made COVID-19 a neglected epidemic in Ethiopia

The biggest challenge to the health system is the war in Tigray and other insecurity all over the country. Conflict has made COVID-19 prevention and vaccination efforts impossible in many areas.
Le 20 décembre 2016, à Canberra, Jean‑Yves Le Drian, alors ministre français de la Défense, signe le « contrat du siècle » avec le premier ministre australien de l’époque Malcolm Turnbull. Brenton Edwards/AFP

Pourquoi la rupture par l’Australie du « contrat du siècle » était prévisible

Pour l’Australie, le dilemme était simple : se conduire en nation souveraine et respecter le contrat passé avec la France, ou privilégier sa sécurité et son lien de longue date avec Washington.
‘That physicians in the Anti-Vaccine Society (England, early 19th C) were concerned that Jenner’s smallpox inoculation gave people bovine-like features.’ – historian’s tweet in reply to author asking about memorable finds. Twitter/Wellcome

I asked historians what find made them go ‘wait, wut?’ Here’s a taste of the hundreds of replies

Historians, archivists and other researchers got in touch with tales of their archival finds and bizarre research moments. These ranged from the quirky to the disturbing to the profound.
Archaeologists and marine scientists must work together with Indigenous communities and policy makers to protect Australia’s cultural heritage above and below the sea. Sam Wright

Australia’s coastal waters are rich in Indigenous cultural heritage, but it remains hidden and under threat

With 300 stone artefacts submerged on Australia’s continental shelf last year, Indigenous underwater cultural heritage needs to be prioritised in marine science and industry practices.

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