A cacophony of hateful rhetoric has made it hard for those tasked with spotting the emergence of violent extremism to separate it from the background noise. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Christchurch attacks are a stark warning of toxic political environment that allows hate to flourish

There is deep sadness in the Christchurch attacks, but little shock. We need to address the permissive political environment that allows such hateful extremism to be promulgated so openly.
“Standing against hate” requires robust leadership from the politicians. AAP

A truly inclusive society requires political restraint

The Senate doesn't have the power to throw him out, but it would be a bad course anyway, setting an unfortunate precedent as well as making him a martyr in the eyes of the extreme right.

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